Increased parasite resistance and recurrent airway obstruction in horses of a high-prevalence family

Neuhaus, Sabrina; Bründler, Patricia; Frey, Caroline; Gottstein, Bruno; Doherr, Marcus; Gerber, Vinzenz (2010). Increased parasite resistance and recurrent airway obstruction in horses of a high-prevalence family. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 24(2), pp. 407-413. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1939-1676.2009.0465.x

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BACKGROUND: Equine recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) shares many characteristics with human asthma. In humans, an inverse relationship between susceptibility to asthma and resistance to parasites is suspected. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Members of a high-incidence RAO half-sibling family (F) shed fewer strongylid eggs compared with RAO-unaffected pasture mates (PM) and that RAO-affected horses shed fewer eggs than RAO-unaffected half-siblings. ANIMALS: Seventy-three F and 73 unrelated, age matched PM. METHODS: Cases and controls kept under the same management and deworming regime were examined. Each individual was classified as RAO affected or RAO unaffected and fecal samples were collected before and 1-3 weeks and 3 months after deworming. Samples were analyzed by combined sedimentation-flotation and modified McMaster methods and classified into 3 categories of 0 eggs per gram of feces (EpG), 1-100 EpG, and > 100 EpG, respectively. RESULTS: PM compared with RAO-affected F had a 16.7 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.0-136.3) times higher risk for shedding > 100 EpG compared with 0 EpG and a 5.3 (95% CI: 1.0-27.4) times higher risk for shedding > 100 EpG compared with 0 EpG. There was no significant effect when RAO-unaffected F were compared with their PM. RAO-unaffected compared with RAO-affected offspring had a 5.8 (95% CI: 0.0-1.0) times higher risk for shedding 1-100 EpG. Age, sex, breed, and sharing pastures with other species had no significant confounding effects. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: RAO is associated with resistance against strongylid parasites in a high-prevalence family.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Equine Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Neuhaus, Sabrina; Bründler, Patricia; Frey, Caroline; Gottstein, Bruno; Doherr, Marcus and Gerber, Vinzenz

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:36

Last Modified:

04 Feb 2016 10:37

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1939-1676.2009.0465.x

PubMed ID:

20102498

Web of Science ID:

000275106700022

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.14298

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/14298 (FactScience: 221193)

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