‘Without Coffee, Our Algeria Would Be Uninhabitable’: Ambivalent Attitudes to Coffee Drinking in Medical Accounts on Nineteenth Century Algeria

Studer, Nina S. (2021). ‘Without Coffee, Our Algeria Would Be Uninhabitable’: Ambivalent Attitudes to Coffee Drinking in Medical Accounts on Nineteenth Century Algeria. Historische Anthropologie, 29(1), pp. 11-30. Böhlau 10.7788/hian.2021.29.1.11

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French colonial doctors writing about nineteenth century Algeria portrayed coffee as a hygienic drink, which protected and stimulated French soldiers and settlers in the hostile climate. Doctors therefore advocated the distribution of coffee to soldiers because it was seen as advantageous to France’s colonisation of the region. By contrast, when Algerian Muslims drank coffee, they were described in the same source material as lethargic and overly sociable. The history of coffee in colonial Algeria should be seen as a case study of a shared consumption between colonisers and colonised, yet one with vastly different outcomes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Art and Cultural Studies > Institute for Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

UniBE Contributor:

Studer, Nina Salouâ

Subjects:

200 Religion > 290 Other religions
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 390 Customs, etiquette & folklore
900 History > 940 History of Europe
900 History > 960 History of Africa

ISSN:

2194-4032

Publisher:

Böhlau

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nina Salouâ Studer

Date Deposited:

12 May 2020 10:31

Last Modified:

31 May 2021 10:59

Publisher DOI:

10.7788/hian.2021.29.1.11

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/143019

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/143019

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