Pelagic fish predation is stronger at temperate latitudes than near the equator.

Roesti, Marius; Anstett, Daniel N; Freeman, Benjamin G; Lee-Yaw, Julie A; Schluter, D; Chavarie, Louise; Rolland, Jonathan; Holzman, Roi (2020). Pelagic fish predation is stronger at temperate latitudes than near the equator. Nature Communications, 11(1), p. 1527. Springer Nature 10.1038/s41467-020-15335-4

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Species interactions are widely thought to be strongest in the tropics, potentially contributing to the greater number of species at lower latitudes. Yet, empirical tests of this “biotic interactions” hypothesis remain limited and often provide mixed results. Here, we analyze 55 years of catch per unit effort data from pelagic longline fisheries to estimate the strength of predation exerted by large predatory fish in the world’s oceans. We test two central tenets of the biotic interactions hypothesis: that predation is (1) strongest near the equator, and (2) positively correlated with species richness. Counter to these predictions, we find that predation is (1) strongest in or near the temperate zone and (2) negatively correlated with oceanic fish species richness. These patterns suggest that, at least for pelagic fish predation, common assumptions about the latitudinal distribution of species interactions do not apply, thereby challenging a leading explanation for the latitudinal gradient in species diversity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Evolutionary Ecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE)

UniBE Contributor:

Rösti, Marius Samuel

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

2041-1723

Publisher:

Springer Nature

Language:

English

Submitter:

Catherine Peichel

Date Deposited:

23 Apr 2020 13:15

Last Modified:

26 Apr 2020 02:47

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41467-020-15335-4

PubMed ID:

32235853

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.143427

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/143427

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