Development and Evaluation of Maze-Like Puzzle Games to Assess Cognitive and Motor Function in Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

Nef, Tobias; Chesham, Alvin; Schütz, Narayan; Botros, Angela Amira; Vanbellingen, Tim; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Müllner, Julia; Müri, René Martin; Urwyler, Prabitha (2020). Development and Evaluation of Maze-Like Puzzle Games to Assess Cognitive and Motor Function in Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases. Frontiers in aging neuroscience, 12(87), p. 87. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fnagi.2020.00087

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There is currently a need for engaging, user-friendly, and repeatable tasks for assessment of cognitive and motor function in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluated the feasibility of a maze-like Numberlink puzzle game in assessing differences in game-based measures of cognition and motor function due to age and neurodegenerative diseases. Fifty-five participants, including young (18–31 years, n = 18), older (64–79 years, n = 14), and oldest adults (86–98 years, n = 14), and patients with Parkinson’s (59–76 years, n = 4) and Huntington’s disease (HD; 35–66 years, n = 5) played different difficulty levels of the Numberlink puzzle game and completed usability questionnaires and tests for psychomotor, attentional, visuospatial, and constructional and executive function. Analyses of Numberlink game-based cognitive (solving time and errors) and motor [mean velocity and movement direction changes (MDC)] performance metrics revealed statistically significant differences between age groups and between patients with HD and older adults. However, patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) did not differ from older adults. Correlational analyses showed significant associations between game-based performance and movement metrics and performance on neuropsychological tests for psychomotor, attentional, visuospatial, and constructional and executive function. Furthermore, varying characteristics of the Numberlink puzzle game succeeded in creating graded difficulty levels. Findings from this study support recent suggestions that data from a maze-like puzzle game provide potential “digital biomarkers” to assess changes in psychomotor, visuoconstructional, and executive function related to aging and neurodegeneration. In particular, game-based movement measures from the maze-like puzzle Numberlink games are promising as a tool to monitor the progression of motor impairment in neurodegenerative diseases. Further studies are needed to more comprehensively establish the cognitive validity and test–retest reliability of using Numberlink puzzles as a valid cognitive assessment tool.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research
10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Gerontechnology and Rehabilitation

UniBE Contributor:

Nef, Tobias; Chesham, Alvin; Schütz, Narayan; Botros, Angela Amira; Vanbellingen, Tim; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Müllner, Julia Nicole Maria; Müri, René Martin and Urwyler-Harischandra, Prabitha

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1663-4365

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Angela Amira Botros

Date Deposited:

11 May 2020 09:21

Last Modified:

17 May 2020 02:46

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fnagi.2020.00087

PubMed ID:

32372942

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.143517

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/143517

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