Interventions in Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family: A Systematic Literature Review.

Zante, Björn; Camenisch, Sabine; Schefold, Jörg Christian (2020). Interventions in Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family: A Systematic Literature Review. Critical care medicine, 48(9), e835-e840. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/CCM.0000000000004450

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OBJECTIVES

Data show that family members of ICU patients may have high levels of anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorders, and/or complicated grief. This was previously referred to as post-intensive care syndrome-family. We systematically review randomized controlled trials for post-intensive care syndrome-family.

DATA SOURCES

Systematic research in databases (Pubmed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINHAL for articles published between January 2000 and October 2019).

STUDY SELECTION

Interventions in randomized controlled trials for post-intensive care syndrome-family in relatives of adult ICU patients.

DATA EXTRACTION

Review, quality assessment, and risk assessment for bias of eligible publications were performed along recommended guidelines for each investigation. Quality assessment graded studies into "strong" (n = 5), "moderate" (n = 4), and "weak" (n = 2).

DATA SYNTHESIS

Out of 2,399 publications, 11 investigations were found eligible (3,183 relatives of ICU patients). Studies addressed interventions during ICU stay (n = 6), during the post-ICU period (n = 4), or both (n = 1). Two studies included relatives of dying/deceased patients. One study implemented end-of-life conferences and showed reduced prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (45% vs 69%; p = 0.01), anxiety (45% vs 67%; p = 0.02), and depression (29% vs 56%; p = 0.003). Family conferences with a physician and proactive participation of a nurse reduced anxiety-scores (p = 0.01) without reducing anxiety prevalence (33.3% vs 52.3%; p = 0.08). Other studies failed to improve symptoms or reduce prevalence of post-intensive care syndrome-family. Interestingly, condolence letters may even increase prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (52.4% vs 37.1%; p = 0.03). Meetings without the presence of ICU physicians were shown to increase Impact of Event Scale-Revised scores (25.9 vs 21.3; p = 0.0495).

CONCLUSIONS

Only few data are available on interventions for post-intensive care syndrome-family. It appears that proactive communication and provision of information seems pivotal for post-intensive care syndrome-family treatment. Interestingly, some interventions may even worsen post-intensive care syndrome-family. In the light of the relevance of post-intensive care syndrome-family in daily ICU care, more high-quality data seems urgently needed.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care

UniBE Contributor:

Zante, Björn; Camenisch, Sabine and Schefold, Jörg Christian

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0090-3493

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Mirella Aeberhard

Date Deposited:

06 Jul 2020 11:04

Last Modified:

24 Aug 2020 01:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/CCM.0000000000004450

PubMed ID:

32590386

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.144892

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/144892

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