Symptoms and quality of life in patients with coexistent atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

Stempfel, Samuel; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Blum, Steffen; Meyre, Pascal; Gugganig, Rebecca; Beer, Jürg H; Kobza, Richard; Kühne, Michael; Moschovitis, Giorgio; Menghini, Gianluca; Novak, Jan; Osswald, Stefan; Rodondi, Nicolas; Moutzouri, Elisavet; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Witassek, Fabienne; Conen, David; Sticherling, Christian (2020). Symptoms and quality of life in patients with coexistent atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. International Journal of Cardiology. Heart & Vasculature, 29, p. 100556. Elsevier 10.1016/j.ijcha.2020.100556

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Aims Atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) are two of the most common atrial arrhythmias and often coexist. Many patients with AF or AFL are symptomatic, which impacts their quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to determine whether coexistent AFL represents an added burden for AF patients. Methods We combined baseline data from two large prospective, observational, multicenter cohort studies (BEAT-AF and Swiss-AF). All 3931 patients included in this analysis had documented AF. We obtained information on comorbidities, medication, and lifestyle factors. All participants had a clinical examination and a resting ECG. Symptom burden and QoL at the baseline examination were compared between patients with and without coexistent AFL using multivariable adjusted regression models. Results Overall, 809 (20.6%) patients had a history of AFL. Patients with coexistent AFL more often had history of heart failure (28% vs 23%, p = 0.01), coronary artery disease (30% vs 26%, p = 0.007), failed therapy with antiarrhythmic drugs (44% vs 29%, p < 0.001), and more often underwent AF-related interventions (36% vs 17%, p < 0.001). They were more often symptomatic (70% vs 66%, p = 0.04) and effort intolerant (OR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.01-1.28; p = 0.04). Documented AFL on the baseline ECG was associated with more symptoms (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.26-4.20; p = 0.007). Conclusion Our data indicates that patients with coexistent AF and AFL are more often symptomatic and report poorer quality of life compared to patients suffering from AF only.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Rodondi, Nicolas and Moutzouri, Elisavet

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2352-9067

Publisher:

Elsevier

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

30 Jun 2020 19:06

Last Modified:

09 Jul 2020 11:24

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ijcha.2020.100556

PubMed ID:

32577496

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Atrial fibrillation Atrial flutter Quality of life Symptoms

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.144898

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/144898

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