How Much School Does Vocational Education Training (VET) Need? How Swiss Youths Get Selected for VET Programmes with Restricted Schooling and What it Does to Their Careers

Meyer, Thomas; Sacchi, Stefan (2020). How Much School Does Vocational Education Training (VET) Need? How Swiss Youths Get Selected for VET Programmes with Restricted Schooling and What it Does to Their Careers. Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie, 72(S1), pp. 105-134. Springer VS 10.1007/s11577-020-00679-y

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Swiss vocational education and training (VET) at upper secondary level is characterised by strong vertical stratification. Academically demanding programmes with high potential for further education and labour market careers contrast with academically more modest programmes of restricted potential. To date, there is little research available on the selection mechanisms at work with regard to access to this stratified system, just as little as there is on the effects of these programmes on subsequent education and careers. Drawing on the Swiss longitudinal TREE (Transitions from Education to Employment) data set, this article first models the selection at the transition to basic VET with varying degrees of vocational) schooling. In a second step and by means of a matching procedure, we estimate the effects of these programmes on subsequent education and careers. Our findings highlight that entry selection into basic VET is strongly channelled institutionally, and is determined less by skills and achievement than by characteristics of social origin. The analysis of effects shows that, even under comparable initial school and family conditions, enrolling in a basic VET programme with restricted academic programme has an unfavourable effect on later training and career opportunities.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

03 Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences > Social Sciences > Institute of Sociology

UniBE Contributor:

Meyer, Thomas and Sacchi, Stefan

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

0023-2653

Publisher:

Springer VS

Projects:

[1036] Transitions from Education to Employment (TREE) Official URL

Language:

German

Submitter:

Thomas Meyer

Date Deposited:

07 Jul 2020 17:23

Last Modified:

20 Sep 2020 02:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s11577-020-00679-y

Related URLs:

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.145060

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/145060

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