Occupational, personal and psychosocial resources for preventing persistent low back pain

Melloh, Markus; Salathé, Cornelia Rolli; Elfering, Achim; Käser, Anja; Barz, Thomas; Aghayev, Emin; Röder, Christoph; Theis, Jean-Claude (2013). Occupational, personal and psychosocial resources for preventing persistent low back pain. International journal of occupational safety and ergonomics, 19(1), pp. 29-40. Warszawa: Central Institute for Labour Protection 10.1179/2049396712Y.0000000012

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The aim of this prospective cohort study was to identify modifiable protective factors of the progression of acute/subacute low back pain (LBP) to the persistent state at an early stage to reduce the socioeconomic burden of persistent LBP. Patients attending a health practitioner for acute/subacute LBP were assessed at baseline addressing occupational, personal and psychosocial factors, and followed up over 12 weeks. Pearson correlations were calculated between these baseline factors and the presence of nonpersistent LBP at 12-week follow-up. For those factors found to be significant, multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. The final 3-predictor model included job satisfaction, mental health and social support. The accuracy of the model was 72%, with 81% of nonpersistent and 60% of persistent LBP patients correctly identified. Further research is necessary to confirm the role of different types of social support regarding their prognostic influence on the development of persistent LBP.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute for Evaluative Research into Orthopaedic Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Aghayev, Emin and Röder, Christoph

ISSN:

1080-3548

Publisher:

Central Institute for Labour Protection

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:36

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 21:26

Publisher DOI:

10.1179/2049396712Y.0000000012

PubMed ID:

23498709

Web of Science ID:

000316007300004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/14518 (FactScience: 221558)

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