Mechanical chest compression devices in the helicopter emergency medical service in Switzerland.

Pietsch, Urs; Reiser, David; Wenzel, Volker; Knapp, Jürgen; Tissi, Mario; Theiler, Lorenz; Rauch, Simon; Meuli, Lorenz; Albrecht, Roland (2020). Mechanical chest compression devices in the helicopter emergency medical service in Switzerland. Scandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine, 28(1), p. 71. BioMed Central 10.1186/s13049-020-00758-1

[img]
Preview
Text
document.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (854kB) | Preview

BACKGROUND

Over the past years, several emergency medical service providers have introduced mechanical chest compression devices (MCDs) in their protocols for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Especially in helicopter emergency medical systems (HEMS), which have limitations regarding loading weight and space and typically operate in rural and remote areas, whether MCDs have benefits for patients is still unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MCDs in a large Swiss HEMS system.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We conducted a retrospective observational study of all HEMS missions of Swiss Air rescue Rega between January 2014 and June 2016 with the use of an MCD (Autopulse®). Details of MCD use and patient outcome are reported from the medical operation journals and the hospitals' discharge letters.

RESULTS

MCDs were used in 626 HEMS missions, and 590 patients (94%) could be included. 478 (81%) were primary missions and 112 (19%) were interhospital transfers. Forty-nine of the patients in primary missions were loaded under ongoing CPR with MCDs. Of the patients loaded after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 20 (7%) experienced a second CA during the flight. In interhospital transfers, 102 (91%) only needed standby use of the MCD. Five (5%) patients were loaded into the helicopter with ongoing CPR. Five (5%) patients went into CA during flight and the MCD had to be activated. A shockable cardiac arrhythmia was the only factor significantly associated with better survival in resuscitation missions using MCD (OR 0.176, 95% confidence interval 0.084 to 0.372, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION

We conclude that equipping HEMS with MCDs may be beneficial, with non-trauma patients potentially benefitting more than trauma patients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy

UniBE Contributor:

Knapp, Jürgen and Theiler, Lorenz

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1757-7241

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannie Wurz

Date Deposited:

05 Aug 2020 07:39

Last Modified:

09 Aug 2020 02:43

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s13049-020-00758-1

PubMed ID:

32711548

Uncontrolled Keywords:

AutoPulse Cardiopulmonary arrest Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Helicopter emergency medical services Load-distributing band CPR device Mechanical chest compression devices

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.145570

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/145570

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback