Including tree spatial extension in the evaluation of neighbourhood competition effects in Bornean rain forest

Newbery, David M.; Stoll, Peter (4 August 2020). Including tree spatial extension in the evaluation of neighbourhood competition effects in Bornean rain forest (bioRxiv). Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory 10.1101/2020.07.27.222513

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Classical tree neighbourhood models use size variables acting at point distances. In a new approach here, trees were spatially extended as a function of their crown sizes, represented impressionistically as points within crown areas. Extension was accompanied by plasticity in the form of crown removal or relocation under the overlap of taller trees. Root systems were supposedly extended in a similar manner. For the 38 most abundant species in the focal size class (10 - <100 cm stem girth) in two 4-ha plots at Danum (Sabah), for periods P1 (1986-1996) and P2 (1996-2007), stem growth rate and tree survival were individually regressed against stem size, and neighbourhood conspecific (CON) and heterospecific (HET) basal areas within incremented radii. Model parameters were critically assessed, and statistical robustness in the modelling set by randomization testing. Classical and extended models differed importantly in their outcomes. Crown extension weakened the relationship of CON effect on growth versus plot species’ abundance, showing that models without plasticity over-estimated negative density dependence. A significant negative trend of difference in CON effects on growth (P2 − P1) versus CON or HET effect on survival in P1 was strongest with crown extension. Model outcomes did not then support an explanation of CON and HET effects being due to (asymmetric) competition for light alone. An alternative hypothesis is that changes in CON effects on small trees, largely incurred by a drought phase (relaxing light limitation) in P2, and following the more shaded (suppressing) conditions in P1, were likely due to species-specific (symmetric) root competition and mycorrhizal processes. The very high variation in neighbourhood composition and abundances led to a strong ‘neighbourhood stochasticity’, and hence to largely idiosyncratic species’ responses. A need to much better understand the roles of rooting structure and processes at the individual tree level was highlighted.

Item Type:

Working Paper

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Vegetation Ecology [discontinued]
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Newbery, David McClintock and Stoll, Peter

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

Series:

bioRxiv

Publisher:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

07 Aug 2020 09:30

Last Modified:

07 Aug 2020 09:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1101/2020.07.27.222513

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.145621

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/145621

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