Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation activates glial cells and inhibits neurogenesis after pneumococcal meningitis

Muri, Lukas; Oberhänsli, Simone; Buri, Michelle; Le, Ngoc Dung; Grandgirard, Denis; Bruggmann, Rémy; Müri, René M.; Leib, Stephen L. (2020). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation activates glial cells and inhibits neurogenesis after pneumococcal meningitis. PLoS ONE, 15(9), e0232863. Public Library of Science 10.1371/journal.pone.0232863

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Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) causes damage to the hippocampus, a brain structure critically involved in learning and memory. Hippocampal injury-which compromises neurofunctional outcome-occurs as apoptosis of progenitor cells and immature neurons of the hippocampal dentate granule cell layer thereby impairing the regenerative capacity of the hippocampal stem cell niche. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) harbours the potential to modulate the proliferative activity of this neuronal stem cell niche. In this study, specific rTMS protocols-namely continuous and intermittent theta burst stimulation (cTBS and iTBS)-were applied on infant rats microbiologically cured from PM by five days of antibiotic treatment. Following two days of exposure to TBS, differential gene expression was analysed by whole transcriptome analysis using RNAseq. cTBS provoked a prominent effect in inducing differential gene expression in the cortex and the hippocampus, whereas iTBS only affect gene expression in the cortex. TBS induced polarisation of microglia and astrocytes towards an inflammatory phenotype, while reducing neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and regeneration. cTBS was further found to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. We conclude that cTBS intensified neuroinflammation after PM, which translated into increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators thereby inhibiting neuroregeneration.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases > Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases > Clinical Microbiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Services > Genomics

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Muri, Lukas Kilian; Oberhänsli, Simone; Buri, Michelle; Le, Ngoc Dung; Grandgirard, Denis; Bruggmann, Rémy; Müri, René Martin and Leib, Stephen

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1932-6203

Publisher:

Public Library of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Angela Amira Botros

Date Deposited:

28 Sep 2020 09:57

Last Modified:

28 Sep 2020 09:57

Publisher DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0232863

PubMed ID:

32915781

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.146719

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/146719

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