Sensorimotor aspects of high-speed artificial gravity: II. The effect of head position on illusory self motion

Mast, Fred W.; Newby, Nathaniel J.; Young, Laurence R. (2002). Sensorimotor aspects of high-speed artificial gravity: II. The effect of head position on illusory self motion. Journal of vestibular research - equilibrium & orientation, 12(5-6), pp. 283-289. IOS Press

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The effects of cross-coupled stimuli on the semicircular canals are shown to be influenced by the position of the subject's head with respect to gravity and the axis of rotation, but not by the subject's head position relative to the trunk. Seventeen healthy subjects made head yaw movements out of the horizontal plane while lying on a horizontal platform (MIT short radius centrifuge) rotating at 23 rpm about an earth-vertical axis. The subjects reported the magnitude and duration of the illusory pitch or roll sensations elicited by the cross-coupled rotational stimuli acting on the semicircular canals. The results suggest an influence of head position relative to gravity. The magnitude estimation is higher and the sensation decays more slowly when the head's final position is toward nose-up (gravity in the subject's head x-z-plane) compared to when the head is turned toward the side (gravity in the subject's head y-z-plane). The results are discussed with respect to artificial gravity in space and the possible role of pre-adaptation to cross-coupled angular accelerations on earth.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology

UniBE Contributor:

Mast, Fred

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0957-4271

Publisher:

IOS Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannette Gatschet

Date Deposited:

04 Nov 2020 17:21

Last Modified:

04 Nov 2020 17:21

PubMed ID:

14501104

Uncontrolled Keywords:

NASA Discipline Neuroscience Non-NASA Center

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147261

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147261

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