Deep Brain Stimulation Impact on Social and Occupational Functioning in Parkinson's Disease with Early Motor Complications.

Stoker, Valerie; Krack, Paul; Tonder, Lisa; Barnett, Gillian; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Schnitzler, Alfons; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Timmermann, Lars; Rau, Joern; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Vidailhet, Marie; Deuschl, Günther (2020). Deep Brain Stimulation Impact on Social and Occupational Functioning in Parkinson's Disease with Early Motor Complications. Movement disorders clinical practice, 7(6), pp. 672-680. Wiley 10.1002/mdc3.13015

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Background

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves motor symptoms and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and early motor complications, suggesting that DBS could be prescribed to the working-age PD population.

Objectives

To investigate the effect of DBS compared with best medical therapy (BMT) on social, psychosocial, and occupational functioning in patients with PD ≤60 years of age with early motor complications, its correlates, and possible underlying rationale.

Methods

Methods included analyses of the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale, Scales for Outcomes for Parkinson's-Psychosocial, Professional Fitness, Starkstein Apathy Scale, and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale from the EARLYSTIM study.

Results

Compared with BMT, DBS resulted in significantly greater improvements from baseline through 24 months in social,occupational, and psychosocial functioning. Yet, work status in the 2 groups did not differ at baseline and 24 months. Physicians reported a significantly higher percentage of patients in the BMT group unable to work at 24 months relative to baseline compared with the DBS group. Apathy was significantly worse in patients for whom physicians overrated ability to work when compared with patients' own ratings than in the group of patients who physicians' ability to work ratings were comparable to, or worse than, patients' self-ratings of ability to work.

Conclusions

For patients aged ≤60 years with PD and early motor complications, DBS provided significant improvements in social, occupational, and psychosocial function, but not in the actual work engagement compared with BMT at 2 years. Apathy may impact ability to work.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Krack, Paul

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2330-1619

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Kottler

Date Deposited:

13 Nov 2020 13:33

Last Modified:

24 Feb 2021 07:18

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/mdc3.13015

PubMed ID:

32775513

Uncontrolled Keywords:

deep brain stimulation, Parkinson's disease, productivity, occupational, psychosocial.

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147378

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147378

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