Thalamic and neocortical differences in the relationship between the time course of delta and sigma power during NREM sleep in humans.

Sarasso, Simone; Zubler, Frederic; Pigorini, Andrea; Sartori, Ivana; Castana, Laura; Nobili, Lino (2021). Thalamic and neocortical differences in the relationship between the time course of delta and sigma power during NREM sleep in humans. Journal of sleep research, 30(3), e13166. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jsr.13166

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Sleep spindles and slow waves are the hallmarks of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and are produced by the dynamic interplay between thalamic and cortical regions. Several studies in both human and animal models have focused their attention on the relationship between electroencephalographic (EEG) spindles and slow waves during NREM, using the power in the sigma and delta bands as a surrogate for the production of spindles and slow waves. A typical report is an overall inverse relationship between the time course of sigma and delta power as measured by a single correlation coefficient both within and across NREM episodes. Here we analysed stereotactically implanted intracerebral electrode (Stereo-EEG [SEEG]) recordings during NREM simultaneously acquired from thalamic and from several neocortical sites in six neurosurgical patients. We investigated the relationship between the time course of delta and sigma power and found that, although at the cortical level it shows the expected inverse relationship, these two frequency bands follow a parallel time course at the thalamic level. Both these observations were consistent across patients and across different cortical as well as thalamic regions. These different temporal dynamics at the neocortical and thalamic level are discussed, considering classical as well as more recent interpretations of the neurophysiological determinants of sleep spindles and slow waves. These findings may also help understanding the regulatory mechanisms of these fundamental sleep EEG graphoelements across different brain compartments.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Zubler, Frédéric

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0962-1105

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Kottler

Date Deposited:

12 Nov 2020 16:22

Last Modified:

29 May 2021 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jsr.13166

PubMed ID:

32830381

Uncontrolled Keywords:

slow waves spindles stereo-EEG thalamus

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147393

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147393

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