Archaeological and palaeoecological investigations at Burgäschisee (Swiss Plateau): new interdisciplinary insights in Neolithic settlement, land use and vegetation dynamics

Hafner, Albert; Rey, Fabian; Hostettler, Marco; Laabs, Julian; Bolliger, Matthias; Brombacher, Christoph; Francuz, John; Gobet, Erika; Häberle, Simone; Rentzel, Philippe; Schäfer, Marguerita; Schibler, Jörg; Wey, Othmar; Tinner, Willy (2020). Archaeological and palaeoecological investigations at Burgäschisee (Swiss Plateau): new interdisciplinary insights in Neolithic settlement, land use and vegetation dynamics. In: Hafner, Albert; Dolbunova, Ekaterina; Mazurkevich, Andrey; Pranckenaite, Elena; Hinz, Martin (eds.) Settling Waterscapes in Europe. The Archaeology of Neolithic and Bronze Age Pile-Dwellings. Open Series in Prehistoric Archaeology: Vol. 1 (pp. 173-204). Heidelberg: Propylaeum

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The prehistoric lake dwellings of Switzerland, Germany, and Austria have been known for more than 150 years. Of these, 111 were awarded UNESCO World Cultural Heritage status in 2011. Mainly dating from the Neolithic (including the Chalcolithic or Copper Age) and the Bronze Age, lacustrine settlements represent an early phase of sedentarisation in the northern foothills of the Alps. Despite much significant research on the material culture, settlement dynamics, economy, and ecology, the focus has hitherto almost exclusively been on the classic sites situated on the larger northern pre-Alpine lakes in the so-called Three Lakes region of western Switzerland and on the Lakes of Geneva, Zurich, and Constance. The international and interdisciplinary research project ’Beyond lake villages: studying Neolithic environmental changes and human impact on small lakes in Switzerland, Germany and Austria’ was launched in 2015 and is jointly funded by the Swiss (SNF), German (DFG), and Austrian (FWF) National Science Foundations. Research teams in prehistoric archaeology and palaeoecology from the universities of Bern, Basel, Vienna, and Innsbruck as well as the cultural heritage management authorities of the German State of Baden-Württemberg and the Swiss Cantons of Bern and Solothurn are concentrating their efforts on three Neolithic settlement areas on the Swiss Plateau, the German Westallgäu, and the Austrian Salzkammergut. Research is focused on small, deep lakes and their immediate surroundings, with the aim of obtaining new highresolution data on the natural environment and human impact on the landscape. Our ongoing palaeoecological investigations have confirmed that small, deep lakes such as Burgäschisee and Moossee in Switzerland preserve laminated annual sediments that have enormous potential for generating high-resolution, diachronic data on vegetation, palaeoclimate, and human impact. Through the integration of wetland archaeology and palaeoecology, we hope to generate new data and models that will help to understand the variability of human impact on landscapes, especially the environmental interactions of Neolithic societies in the circum-Alpine region. The overall aim of the project is to gain a better understanding of large-scale processes of adaptation and anthropogenic impact over time.

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Palaeoecology
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of Archaeological Sciences > Pre- and Early History
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

Graduate School:

Graduate School of Climate Sciences

UniBE Contributor:

Hafner, Albert; Rey, Fabian; Hostettler, Marco; Laabs, Julian; Bolliger, Matthias; Francuz, John; Gobet, Erika; Wey, Othmar and Tinner, Willy

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)
900 History > 930 History of ancient world (to ca. 499)

ISSN:

2701-2859

ISBN:

978-3-948465-83-4

Series:

Open Series in Prehistoric Archaeology

Publisher:

Propylaeum

Language:

English

Submitter:

Albert Hafner-Lafitte

Date Deposited:

17 Nov 2020 15:54

Last Modified:

17 Nov 2020 15:55

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147605

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147605

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