Toxicosis with grapes or raisins causing acute kidney injury and neurological signs in dogs

Schweighauser, Ariane; Henke, Diana; Oevermann, Anna; Gurtner, Corinne; Francey, Thierry (2020). Toxicosis with grapes or raisins causing acute kidney injury and neurological signs in dogs. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 34(5), pp. 1957-1966. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jvim.15884

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Background: The ingestion of grapes or raisins has been reported to cause acute kid-
ney injury (AKI) in dogs, with a clinical picture dominated by early gastrointestinal
signs and rapidly developing uremia. Ataxia is mentioned in a few reports, but not
further characterized.
Objectives: To evaluate the clinical, laboratory, and pathological features of dogs
diagnosed with grape or raisin toxicosis (GRT) with emphasis on renal and neurologi-
cal manifestations, compared to a control group of dogs with AKI from other causes.
Animals: Fifteen client-owned dogs with GRT and 74 control dogs.
Methods: Retrospective study over 17 months.
Results: All dogs with GRT were presented with severe AKI (grade 4, n = 5; grade 5,
n = 10). Eleven dogs (73%) had marked forebrain, cerebellar, or vestibular signs. These
manifestations dominated the clinical picture in some dogs, but were not associated
with the severity of azotemia or the presence of systemic hypertension. Eight dogs
(53%) survived, and 5 dogs experienced a complete neurological recovery. Causes of
death were unrelated to the neurological manifestations. Neuropathological examina-
tion of 4 dogs did not identify any structural central nervous system abnormality. Only
2 control dogs (3%) displayed neurological signs with seizures unrelated to the AKI;
42 control dogs (57%) survived.
Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Severe forebrain, cerebellar, or vestibular signs
may be an important feature of GRT and dominate the early clinical picture. The
described features suggest a reversible functional brain injury specific to GRT and
unrelated to uremia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Animal Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Schweighauser, Ariane; Oevermann, Anna; Gurtner, Corinne and Francey, Thierry

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thierry Francey-Spicher

Date Deposited:

11 Nov 2020 11:26

Last Modified:

11 Nov 2020 11:26

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jvim.15884

PubMed ID:

32893916

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147668

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147668

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