Advocating the Development of Next-Generation, Advanced-Design Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Systems.

Runge, Val M.; Heverhagen, Johannes T. (2020). Advocating the Development of Next-Generation, Advanced-Design Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Systems. Investigative radiology, 55(12), pp. 747-753. Wolters Kluwer Health 10.1097/RLI.0000000000000703

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New next-generation low-field magnetic resonance imaging systems (operating in the range of 0.5 T) hold great potential for increasing access to clinical diagnosis and needed health care both in developed countries and worldwide. The relevant history concerning the choice of field strength, which resulted in 1.5 T still dominating today the number of installed systems, is considered, together with design advances possible because of interval developments, since low field was considered for clinical use in the 1980s, and current research. The potential impact of low-cost, advanced-generation low-field magnetic resonance imaging systems, properly designed, is high in terms of further dissemination of health care-across the gamut from industrial to developing countries-regardless of disease entity and anatomic region of involvement, with major niche applications likely as well.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology

UniBE Contributor:

Runge, Val Murray and Heverhagen, Johannes

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1536-0210

Publisher:

Wolters Kluwer Health

Language:

English

Submitter:

Maria de Fatima Henriques Bernardo

Date Deposited:

07 Dec 2020 08:13

Last Modified:

07 Dec 2020 08:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/RLI.0000000000000703

PubMed ID:

33156083

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.147874

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/147874

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