East Anglian English in the English Dialects App: Regional variation in East Anglian English based on evidence from a smartphone-based survey

Britain, David; Blaxter, Tamsin; Leemann, Adrian (2020). East Anglian English in the English Dialects App: Regional variation in East Anglian English based on evidence from a smartphone-based survey. English today, 36(3), pp. 14-30. Cambridge University Press 10.1017/S0266078420000206

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East Anglian English was the first British variety of English to be subject to dialectological scrutiny using sociolinguistic techniques (Trudgill, 1974, and his subsequent work) and since then has been subject to only sporadic investigation (e.g. Britain, 1991, 2014a, 2014b, 2015; Kingston, 2000; Straw, 2006; Amos, 2011; Potter, 2012, 2018; Butcher, 2015). Recent research has suggested that, in those few locations that have been investigated, East Anglian English is gradually losing some of its traditional dialect features, in favour of forms from the South East more generally. Kingston (2000), Britain (2014a) and Potter (2018) all found, for example, a rather steep decline in the use of East Anglia's traditional third-person present-tense zero. Furthermore, we are aware of the arrival into East Anglia of linguistic innovations from the South East of England, such as TH fronting (Trudgill, 1988; Britain, 2005; Potter, 2012) and /l/ vocalisation (Johnson & Britain, 2007; Potter, 2014), but we only know about their success in a few parts of the region – Norwich, East Suffolk and the Fens. Since Trudgill's investigations across East Anglia in the 1970s, however (e.g. Trudgill & Foxcroft, 1978), and despite a few multilocality studies (Britain, 1991, 2014a; Potter, 2018) no research has been able to provide a picture of the state of the traditional dialect across the whole region. We have therefore only a patchy understanding of the extent to which traditional dialect obsolescence, dialect levelling and innovation diffusion have impacted the dialect landscape of this region as a whole.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies > Institute of English Languages and Literatures
06 Faculty of Humanities > Other Institutions > Walter Benjamin Kolleg (WBKolleg) > Center for the Study of Language and Society (CSLS)
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies > Institute of English Languages and Literatures > Modern English Linguistics

UniBE Contributor:

Britain, David

Subjects:

400 Language > 410 Linguistics
400 Language > 420 English & Old English languages
800 Literature, rhetoric & criticism > 820 English & Old English literatures

ISSN:

0266-0784

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Fabienne Blaser

Date Deposited:

08 Dec 2020 08:39

Last Modified:

31 Mar 2021 09:25

Publisher DOI:

10.1017/S0266078420000206

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148079

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148079

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