Glucose management for exercise using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and intermittently scanned CGM (isCGM) systems in type 1 diabetes: position statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) endorsed by JDRF and supported by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Moser, Othmar; Riddell, Michael C; Eckstein, Max L; Adolfsson, Peter; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van den Boom, Louisa; Gillard, Pieter; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Oliver, Nick S; Zaharieva, Dessi P; Battelino, Tadej; de Beaufort, Carine; Bergenstal, Richard M; Buckingham, Bruce; Cengiz, Eda; Deeb, Asma; Heise, Tim; Heller, Simon; Kowalski, Aaron J; Leelarathna, Lalantha; ... (2020). Glucose management for exercise using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and intermittently scanned CGM (isCGM) systems in type 1 diabetes: position statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) endorsed by JDRF and supported by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Diabetologia, 63(12), pp. 2501-2520. Springer 10.1007/s00125-020-05263-9

[img] Text
Moser2020_Article_GlucoseManagementForExerciseUs.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Physical exercise is an important component in the management of type 1 diabetes across the lifespan. Yet, acute exercise increases the risk of dysglycaemia, and the direction of glycaemic excursions depends, to some extent, on the intensity and duration of the type of exercise. Understandably, fear of hypoglycaemia is one of the strongest barriers to incorporating exercise into daily life. Risk of hypoglycaemia during and after exercise can be lowered when insulin-dose adjustments are made and/or additional carbohydrates are consumed. Glycaemic management during exercise has been made easier with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) systems; however, because of the complexity of CGM and isCGM systems, both individuals with type 1 diabetes and their healthcare professionals may struggle with the interpretation of given information to maximise the technological potential for effective use around exercise (i.e. before, during and after). This position statement highlights the recent advancements in CGM and isCGM technology, with a focus on the evidence base for their efficacy to sense glucose around exercise and adaptations in the use of these emerging tools, and updates the guidance for exercise in adults, children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Graphical abstract.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition

UniBE Contributor:

Stettler, Christoph

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0012-186X

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Laura Goetschi

Date Deposited:

09 Dec 2020 09:28

Last Modified:

12 May 2021 08:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00125-020-05263-9

PubMed ID:

33047169

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Adolescents Adults CGM Children Continuous glucose monitoring Exercise Physical activity Position statement Type 1 diabetes

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148217

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148217

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback