Impact of non‐CNS childhood cancer on resting‐state connectivity and its association with cognition

Spitzhüttl, Janine S.; Kronbichler, Martin; Kronbichler, Lisa; Benzing, Valentin; Siegwart, Valerie; Pastore-Wapp, Manuela; Kiefer, Claus; Slavova, Nedelina; Grotzer, Michael; Roebers, Claudia M.; Steinlin, Maja; Leibundgut, Kurt; Everts, Regula (2021). Impact of non‐CNS childhood cancer on resting‐state connectivity and its association with cognition. Brain and Behavior, 11(1), e01931. Wiley 10.1002/brb3.1931

[img]
Preview
Text
brb3.1931_Impact of non-CNS_Spitzüttl.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (866kB) | Preview

Introduction
Non‐central nervous system cancer in childhood (non‐CNS CC) and its treatments pose a major threat to brain development, with implications for functional networks. Structural and functional alterations might underlie the cognitive late‐effects identified in survivors of non‐CNS CC. The present study evaluated resting‐state functional networks and their associations with cognition in a mixed sample of non‐CNS CC survivors (i.e., leukemia, lymphoma, and other non‐CNS solid tumors).

Methods
Forty‐three patients (off‐therapy for at least 1 year and aged 7–16 years) were compared with 43 healthy controls matched for age and sex. High‐resolution T1‐weighted structural magnetic resonance and resting‐state functional magnetic resonance imaging were acquired. Executive functions, attention, processing speed, and memory were assessed outside the scanner.

Results
Cognitive performance was within the normal range for both groups; however, patients after CNS‐directed therapy showed lower executive functions than controls. Seed‐based connectivity analyses revealed that patients exhibited stronger functional connectivity between fronto‐ and temporo‐parietal pathways and weaker connectivity between parietal‐cerebellar and temporal‐occipital pathways in the right hemisphere than controls. Functional hyperconnectivity was related to weaker memory performance in the patients' group.

Conclusion
These data suggest that even in the absence of brain tumors, non‐CNS CC and its treatment can lead to persistent cerebral alterations in resting‐state network connectivity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW)

UniBE Contributor:

Spitzhüttl, Janine Sophie; Benzing, Valentin Johannes; Siegwart, Valerie; Pastore-Wapp, Manuela; Kiefer, Claus; Slavova, Nedelina Bozhidarova; Roebers, Claudia; Steinlin, Maja and Everts, Regula

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISSN:

2162-3279

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Irène Semling-Kirchmeier

Date Deposited:

24 Nov 2020 17:36

Last Modified:

24 Jan 2021 01:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/brb3.1931

PubMed ID:

33205895

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148468

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148468

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback