CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL5 modulation by microbial and biomechanical signals in periodontal cells and tissues-in vitro and in vivo studies.

Rath-Deschner, Birgit; Memmert, Svenja; Damanaki, Anna; Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Eick, Sigrun; Cirelli, Joni A; Götz, Werner; Deschner, James; Jäger, Andreas; Nogueira, Andressa V B (2020). CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL5 modulation by microbial and biomechanical signals in periodontal cells and tissues-in vitro and in vivo studies. Clinical oral investigations, 24(10), pp. 3661-3670. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00784-020-03244-1

[img]
Preview
Text
Rath-Deschner2020_Article_CXCL1CCL2AndCCL5ModulationByMi.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (4MB) | Preview

OBJECTIVES

This study was established to investigate whether the chemokines CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL5 are produced in periodontal cells and tissues and, if so, whether their levels are regulated by microbial and/or mechanical signals.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The chemokine expression and protein levels in gingival biopsies from patients with and without periodontitis were analyzed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The chemokines were also analyzed in gingival biopsies from rats subjected to experimental periodontitis and/or orthodontic tooth movement. Additionally, chemokine levels were determined in periodontal fibroblasts exposed to the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum and mechanical forces by RT-PCR and ELISA.

RESULTS

Higher CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL5 levels were found in human and rat gingiva from sites of periodontitis as compared with periodontally healthy sites. In the rat experimental periodontitis model, the bacteria-induced upregulation of these chemokines was significantly counteracted by orthodontic forces. In vitro, F. nucleatum caused a significant upregulation of all chemokines at 1 day. When the cells were subjected simultaneously to F. nucleatum and mechanical forces, the upregulation of chemokines was significantly inhibited. The transcriptional findings were paralleled at protein level.

CONCLUSIONS

This study provides original evidence in vitro and in vivo that the chemokines CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL5 are regulated by both microbial and mechanical signals in periodontal cells and tissues. Furthermore, our study revealed that biomechanical forces can counteract the stimulatory actions of F. nucleatum on these chemokines.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Mechanical loading might aggravate periodontal infection by compromising the recruitment of immunoinflammatory cells.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Periodontics Research

UniBE Contributor:

Eick, Sigrun

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1432-6981

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Burri

Date Deposited:

21 Dec 2020 14:50

Last Modified:

23 Feb 2021 19:25

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00784-020-03244-1

PubMed ID:

32124070

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Fusobacterium nucleatum Gingivitis Orthodontic tooth movement Periodontitis Periodontium

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148772

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148772

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback