Hyperlipasemia in critically ill dogs with and without acute pancreatitis: Prevalence, underlying diseases, predictors, and outcome

Prümmer, Julia K.; Howard, Judith; Grandt, Lisa M.; Obrador de Aguilar, Rafael; Meneses, Felix; Peters, Laureen M. (2020). Hyperlipasemia in critically ill dogs with and without acute pancreatitis: Prevalence, underlying diseases, predictors, and outcome. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 34(6), pp. 2319-2329. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jvim.15902

[img]
Preview
Text
Pr_mmer_2020_Hyperlipasemia_critically_ill_dogs_JVIM.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial (CC-BY-NC).

Download (2MB) | Preview

Background: Hyperlipasemia is frequently reported in critically ill people without evidence of acute pancreatitis (AP), and has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality.
Hypothesis/Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hyperlipasemia at admission and development of hyperlipasemia during hospitalization in critically ill dogs, explore factors associated with hyperlipasemia, and evaluate association with outcome.
Animals: Critically ill, client owned dogs (n=1,360), presented onas emergencyies and admitted to the intensive care unit, which that had 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero-3-glutaric acid-(6’-methylresorufin) ester (DGGR) lipase activity measured within 24 hours of admission.
Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study of clinical and laboratory records.
Results: The DGGR -lipase activity was increased >above 3×x the upper reference limit at admission in 216/1,360 (16%) dogs, of which 70/216 (32%) had a clinical diagnosis of AP. Other primary conditions associated with hyperlipasemia were renal, endocrine, and immune-mediated diseases, and upper airway obstruction. Predictors of hyperlipasemia at admission were prior glucocorticoid administration, vomiting and abdominal pain, increased age, plasma bilirubin and creatinine concentrations, and decreased hematocrit. Of dogs with repeat measurements, 78/345 (23%) had significantly increased lipase during hospitalization, of which 13/78 (17%) had a clinical diagnosis of AP. Other primary conditions associated with in-hospital hyperlipasemia were renal and immune-mediated disorders. Predictors of developing hyperlipasemia during hospitalization were hemodialysis events, increased plasma bilirubin and creatinine concentrations, and decreased hematocrit. Hyperlipasemia both at admission and during hospitalization was associated with longer hospitalization and higher mortality.
Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Significant DGGR-hyperlipasemia is frequent in critically ill dogs and is associated with a variety of nonpancreatic conditions and a negative outcome.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Internal Medicine
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Central Clinical Laboratory
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Intensive Care Unit, Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Prümmer, Julia Katrin; Howard, Judith; Grandt, Lisa-Maria; Obrador de Aguilar, Rafael; Meneses, Felix Joel and Peters, Laureen Michèle

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Laureen Michèle Peters

Date Deposited:

18 Dec 2020 14:05

Last Modified:

28 Jan 2021 16:54

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jvim.15902

PubMed ID:

32945588

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.148987

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/148987

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback