Toll-like receptors in ischaemia and its potential role in the pathophysiology of muscle damage in critical limb ischaemia

Patel, Hemanshu; Shaw, Sidney G.; Shi-Wen, Xu; Abraham, David; Baker, Daryll M.; Tsui, Janice C. S. (2012). Toll-like receptors in ischaemia and its potential role in the pathophysiology of muscle damage in critical limb ischaemia. Cardiology research and practice, 2012, p. 121237. Cairo (Egypt): SAGE Hindawi

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Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key receptors of the innate immune system which are expressed on immune and nonimmune cells. They are activated by both pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous ligands. Activation of TLRs culminates in the release of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and apoptosis. Ischaemia and ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are associated with significant inflammation and tissue damage. There is emerging evidence to suggest that TLRs are involved in mediating ischaemia-induced damage in several organs. Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is the most severe form of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is associated with skeletal muscle damage and tissue loss; however its pathophysiology is poorly understood. This paper will underline the evidence implicating TLRs in the pathophysiology of cerebral, renal, hepatic, myocardial, and skeletal muscle ischaemia and I/R injury and discuss preliminary data that alludes to the potential role of TLRs in the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle damage in CLI.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Tiefenau Hospital (discontinued) > Forschungsgruppe Vasoaktive Peptide (discontinued)

UniBE Contributor:

Shaw, Sidney

ISSN:

2090-8016

Publisher:

SAGE Hindawi

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:37

Last Modified:

13 Dec 2014 07:50

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.14919

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/14919 (FactScience: 222059)

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