Teaching Middle Ear Anatomy and Basic Ear Surgery Skills: A Qualitative Study Comparing Endoscopic and Microscopic Techniques.

Anschuetz, Lukas; Siggemann, Till; Dür, Cilgia; Dreifuss, Corinne; Caversaccio, Marco; Huwendiek, Sören (2020). Teaching Middle Ear Anatomy and Basic Ear Surgery Skills: A Qualitative Study Comparing Endoscopic and Microscopic Techniques. (In Press). Otolaryngology - head and neck surgery, p. 194599820977191. Sage 10.1177/0194599820977191

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OBJECTIVE

Endoscopic ear surgery is gaining popularity as a minimally invasive surgical technique for middle ear diseases. Its ongoing implementation into clinical routine has consequences regarding teaching of middle ear anatomy and surgery. To improve undergraduate and postgraduate training, we investigated the perception of and preference for endoscopy as compared with microscopy at different educational levels.

STUDY DESIGN

Qualitative study based on a thematic analysis approach.

SETTING

Tertiary academic medical center.

METHODS

After a standardized curriculum was run on endoscopic and microscopic anatomy and surgical skills education, 5 focus groups were held. The interviews were conducted, video recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Analysis of the data gave rise to 11 themes showing the participants' perceptions and preferences.

RESULTS

Five medical students, 11 otorhinolaryngology residents, and 3 staff members participated in this qualitative study. For anatomy teaching, there was a clear preference for the endoscopic technique. The main advantages were the enhanced overview and perception of the anatomic details provided through endoscopy. For skills acquisition, the perceived advantages of the techniques were the same view of the surgical field for endoscopy and the 2-handed surgical technique for microscopy. However, there was no clear preference between the techniques for skills acquisition.

CONCLUSION

The endoscopic technique was generally judged more beneficial for teaching anatomy, especially due to the greater visualization of the complex middle ear anatomy. Given that both techniques will remain important to future surgeons, the relative unique benefits of each must be considered when designing and optimizing curricula for otologic education.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders (ENT)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Assessment and Evaluation Unit (AAE)

UniBE Contributor:

Anschütz, Lukas Peter; Dür, Cilgia; Dreifuss, Corinne; Caversaccio, Marco and Huwendiek, Sören

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0194-5998

Publisher:

Sage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Alexandra Nuoffer

Date Deposited:

05 Jan 2021 13:40

Last Modified:

10 Feb 2021 10:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/0194599820977191

PubMed ID:

33287674

Uncontrolled Keywords:

anatomy education endoscopic ear surgery focus groups qualitative research surgical skills

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/150083

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/150083

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