Sémont Maneuver for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Treatment: Moving in the Correct Plane Matters.

Steiger, Isabel; Götting, Carina; Hool, Sara-Lynn; Morrison, Miranda; Korda, Athanasia; Caversaccio, Marco; Obrist, Dominik; Mantokoudis, Georgios (2021). Sémont Maneuver for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Treatment: Moving in the Correct Plane Matters. Otology & neurotology, 42(3), e341-e347. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002992

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HYPOTHESIS

We aimed to investigate the effect of the head excursion angle on the success of the Sémont Maneuver (SM).

BACKGROUND

SM is performed with the head turned by 45 degrees toward the unaffected ear. In clinical routine, it is unlikely that physicians can turn the head to a position of exactly 45 degrees. Moreover, it is unclear how possible deviations from 45 degrees would affect the outcome with SM.

METHODS

We used an in vitro model (upscaled by ×5) of a posterior semicircular canal with canalithiasis to study head excursion angles (0-75 degrees) and minimum waiting times in SM. Additionally, we measured actual head excursion angles performed by trained physicians during SM on a healthy subject.

RESULTS

Successful canalith repositioning to the utricle was possible at head excursion angles between 21 and 67 degrees. Waiting time increased from 16 to 30 seconds with increasing deviation from 45 degrees. Angles larger than 67 degrees or smaller than 21 degrees did not lead to successful repositioning even after a waiting period of 5 minutes. Physicians set head excursion angles of 50 degrees ±SD 4.8 degrees while performing the SM.

CONCLUSION

Angular deviations up to ±20 degrees from the ideal SCC plane (45 degrees) still allows for successful SM. Although the tested physicians tended to underestimate the actual head excursion angle by 5 degrees (and more), the success of SM will not be affected provided that the waiting time is sufficiently long. Further, the results suggest that the Brandt-Daroff maneuver is a form of habituation training rather than a liberatory maneuver.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Cardiovascular Engineering (CVE)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders (ENT)

UniBE Contributor:

Steiger, Isabel; Götting, Carina; Hool, Sara-Lynn; Morrison, Miranda Claire; Korda, Athanasia; Caversaccio, Marco; Obrist, Dominik and Mantokoudis, Georgios

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1531-7129

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stefan Weder

Date Deposited:

07 Jan 2021 16:19

Last Modified:

10 Feb 2021 01:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/MAO.0000000000002992

PubMed ID:

33165161

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/150355

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/150355

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