Cognitive reserve hypothesis in frontotemporal dementia: A FDG-PET study.

Beyer, Leonie; Meyer-Wilmes, Johanna; Schönecker, Sonja; Schnabel, Jonas; Sauerbeck, Julia; Scheifele, Maximilian; Prix, Catharina; Unterrainer, Marcus; Catak, Cihan; Pogarell, Oliver; Palleis, Carla; Perneczky, Robert; Danek, Adrian; Buerger, Katharina; Bartenstein, Peter; Levin, Johannes; Rominger, Axel; Ewers, Michael; Brendel, Matthias (2021). Cognitive reserve hypothesis in frontotemporal dementia: A FDG-PET study. NeuroImage: Clinical, 29(102535), p. 102535. Elsevier 10.1016/j.nicl.2020.102535

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BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Reserve is defined as the ability to maintain cognitive functions relatively well at a given level of pathology. Early life experiences such as education are associated with lower dementia risk in general. However, whether more years of education guards against the impact of brain alterations also in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has not been shown in a large patient collective. Therefore, we assessed whether education is associated with relatively high cognitive performance despite the presence of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG-PET) hypometabolism in FTD.

METHODS

Sixty-six FTD subjects (age 67 ± 8 years) and twenty-four cognitively healthy controls (HC) were evaluated. Brain regions with FTD-related glucose hypometabolism in the contrast against HC and brain regions that correlate with the cognitive function were defined by a voxel-based analysis and individual FDG-PET values were extracted from all frontotemporal brain areas. Linear regression analysis served to test if education is associated with residualized cognitive performance and regional FDG-PET hypometabolism after controlling for global cognition.

RESULTS

Compared to healthy controls, patients with FTD showed glucose hypometabolism in bilateral frontal and temporal brain areas whereas cognition was only associated with deteriorated glucose metabolism in the left temporal lobe. The education level was significantly correlated with the residualized cognitive performance (residuals from regression analysis between hypometabolism and cognitive function as a quantitative index of reserve) and also negatively correlated with left temporal FDG-PET hypometabolism after controlling for cognition.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with FTD, the education level predicts the existing left temporal FDG-PET hypometabolism at the same cognition level, supporting the cognitive reserve hypothesis in FTD.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Clinic of Nuclear Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Rominger, Axel Oliver

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2213-1582

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sabine Lanz

Date Deposited:

27 Jan 2021 15:49

Last Modified:

11 Mar 2021 15:46

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.nicl.2020.102535

PubMed ID:

33369564

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Cognitive reserve FDG-PET Frontotemporal dementia Hypometabolism

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/150857

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/150857

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