Telephone‐ and Text Message–Based Continuing Care After Residential Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Multicenter Study

Graser, Yolanda; Stutz, Sonja; Rösner, Susanne; Moggi, Franz; Soravia, Leila M. (2020). Telephone‐ and Text Message–Based Continuing Care After Residential Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Multicenter Study. Alcoholism: clinical and experimental research, 45(1), pp. 224-233. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/acer.14499

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Background
Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is characterized by extremely high rates of postresidential treatment relapse, and as such, continuing care to prevent relapse has become an important element in AUD treatment. In this regard, research has yielded heterogeneous evidence on telephone‐based (TEL) and text message–based (TEX) continuing care. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of TEL and TEX continuing care provided in different frequencies by psychotherapists for patients from residential treatments in mitigating the occurrence of posttreatment relapse in patients who completed a 12‐week abstinence‐oriented residential treatment program for AUD.

Methods
A total of 240 patients from 2 residential treatment programs for AUD were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to high‐ (10 contacts) or low‐frequency (3 contacts) TEL, TEX (10 contacts) continuing care, or control group (1 contact) from discharge to 6‐month follow‐up. The TEL was intended to be supportive and consisted of several cognitive behavioral therapy components, whereas the TEX was based on behavioral self‐monitoring techniques and additional calls in case of relapse or as needed. Sociodemographic, clinical, and alcohol‐specific variables at residential treatment discharge and at 5‐month follow‐up were assessed through interviews and questionnaires.

Results
Compared with the control group, patients in the high‐frequency TEL were significantly more abstinent at 6‐month follow‐up and, in case of relapse, showed a tendency toward a longer time to first drink. Moreover, the high‐frequency TEL and TEX groups had significantly higher alcohol‐related self‐efficacy 6 months after residential treatment.

Conclusion
High‐frequency proactive telephone contact by psychotherapists known to the patient may help patients to surmount the vulnerable phase after residential treatment and, in case of relapse, might help patients stay connected to health services, which in turn prevents chronification and facilitates recovery from AUD.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Moggi, Franz and Soravia, Leila

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0145-6008

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Prof. Dr. Leila M. Soravia

Date Deposited:

08 Feb 2021 10:08

Last Modified:

09 Feb 2021 19:28

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/acer.14499

PubMed ID:

33245589

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/151325

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/151325

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