Gene regulation contributes to explain the impact of early life socioeconomic disadvantage on adult inflammatory levels in two cohort studies

Carmeli, Cristian; Kutalik, Zoltán; Pashupati P., Mishra; Porcu, Eleonora; Delpierre, Cyrille; Delaneau, Olivier; Kelly-Irving, Michelle; Bochud, Murielle; Dhayat, Nasser A.; Ponte, Belen; Pruijm, Menno; Ehret, Georg; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T.; Vineis, Paolo; Kivimäki, Mika; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; ... (2021). Gene regulation contributes to explain the impact of early life socioeconomic disadvantage on adult inflammatory levels in two cohort studies. Scientific reports, 11(1), p. 3100. Springer Nature 10.1038/s41598-021-82714-2

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Individuals growing up during childhood in a socioeconomically disadvantaged family experience a higher rate of inflammation-related diseases later in life. Little is known about the mechanisms linking early life experiences to the functioning of the immune system decades later. Here we explore the relationship across social-to-biological layers of early life social exposures on levels of adulthood inflammation (C-reactive protein) and the mediating role of gene regulatory mechanisms, epigenetic and transcriptomic profiling from blood, in 2,329 individuals from two European cohort studies. Consistently across both studies, we find transcriptional activity explains a substantive proportion (up to 78%) of the estimated effect of early life disadvantaged social exposures on levels of adulthood inflammation. Furthermore, we show that mechanisms other than DNA methylation potentially regulate those transcriptional fingerprints. These results further our understanding of social-to-biological transitions by pinpointing the role of pro-inflammatory genes regulation that cannot fully be explained by differential DNA methylation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Nephrology and Hypertension

UniBE Contributor:

Dhayat, Nasser

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Springer Nature

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nasser Dhayat

Date Deposited:

15 Feb 2021 10:15

Last Modified:

14 Mar 2021 17:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41598-021-82714-2

PubMed ID:

33542415

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/151422

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/151422

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