Ruminant organotypic brain-slice cultures as a model for the investigation of CNS listeriosis

Guldimann, Claudia; Lejeune, Beatrice; Hofer, Sandra; Leib, Stephen L.; Frey, Joachim; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Seuberlich, Torsten; Oevermann, Anna (2012). Ruminant organotypic brain-slice cultures as a model for the investigation of CNS listeriosis. International journal of experimental pathology, 93(4), pp. 259-268. Oxford: Blackwell Science 10.1111/j.1365-2613.2012.00821.x

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Central nervous system (CNS) infections in ruminant livestock, such as listeriosis, are of major concern for veterinary and public health. To date, no host-specific in vitro models for ruminant CNS infections are available. Here, we established and evaluated the suitability of organotypic brain-slices of ruminant origin as in vitro model to study mechanisms of Listeria monocytogenes CNS infection. Ruminants are frequently affected by fatal listeric rhombencephalitis that closely resembles the same condition occurring in humans. Better insight into host-pathogen interactions in ruminants is therefore of interest, not only from a veterinary but also from a public health perspective. Brains were obtained at the slaughterhouse, and hippocampal and cerebellar brain-slices were cultured up to 49 days. Viability as well as the composition of cell populations was assessed weekly. Viable neurons, astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes were observed up to 49 days in vitro. Slice cultures were infected with L. monocytogenes, and infection kinetics were monitored. Infected brain cells were identified by double immunofluorescence, and results were compared to natural cases of listeric rhombencephalitis. Similar to the natural infection, infected brain-slices showed focal replication of L. monocytogenes and bacteria were predominantly observed in microglia, but also in astrocytes, and associated with axons. These results demonstrate that organotypic brain-slice cultures of bovine origin survive for extended periods and can be infected easily with L. monocytogenes. Therefore, they are a suitable model to study aspects of host-pathogen interaction in listeric encephalitis and potentially in other neuroinfectious diseases.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Guldimann, Claudia; Lejeune, Beatrice; Leib, Stephen; Frey, Joachim; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Seuberlich, Torsten and Oevermann, Anna

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0959-9673

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:38

Last Modified:

08 Jul 2015 08:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1365-2613.2012.00821.x

PubMed ID:

22804762

Web of Science ID:

000306516500056

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.15182

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/15182 (FactScience: 222449)

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