The association between physical activity with incident obesity, coronary heart disease, diabetes and hypertension in adults: a systematic review of longitudinal studies published after 2012

Cleven, Laura; Krell-Roesch, Janina; Nigg, Claudio R.; Woll, Alexander (2020). The association between physical activity with incident obesity, coronary heart disease, diabetes and hypertension in adults: a systematic review of longitudinal studies published after 2012. BMC public health, 20(1), p. 726. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12889-020-08715-4

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Background
A growing body of studies that investigated the longitudinal association between physical activity (PA) and the outcome of incident obesity, coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetes and hypertension has become available in recent years. Thus, the purpose of this systematic review was to provide an update on the association between PA and onset of obesity, CHD, diabetes and hypertension in individuals aged ≥18 years who were free of the respective conditions at baseline.
Methods
We systematically searched OVID, Pubmed, and Web of Science databases for pertinent literature published between January of 2012 and February of 2019. To ensure that conclusions are based on high quality evidence, we only included longitudinal studies conducted in samples of ≥500 participants and with ≥5 years of follow-up.
Result
The search yielded 8929 records of which 26 were included in this review. Three studies were conducted on the outcome of incident obesity, eight on incident CHD, nine on incident diabetes, four on incident hypertension, one on the outcome of both diabetes and hypertension, and one on the outcome of CHD, diabetes and hypertension. Overall, there was an association between PA and lower risk of incident obesity, CHD and diabetes, but not hypertension. Higher levels or amount of PA were associated with a reduced risk of new onset of the respective diseases in 20 studies (77%). Whereas four studies reported an elevated risk of incidence of diseases with lower PA levels (15%). PA was not associated with incidence of diseases in two studies (8%).
Conclusion
Higher levels of PA are likely associated with a lower risk of becoming obese, develop CHD or diabetes. These findings replicate and strengthen conclusions from earlier reviews underlining the importance of promoting PA in adults. The associations between PA and incident hypertension were less consistent. More research, particularly using prospective cohort designs in large population-based samples, is needed to further untangle the association between PA and incident hypertension.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW) > Health Science

UniBE Contributor:

Nigg, Claudio Renato

Subjects:

700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISSN:

1471-2458

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Edith Desideria Imthurn

Date Deposited:

05 Feb 2021 17:15

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2021 06:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12889-020-08715-4

PubMed ID:

32429951

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Physical activity, Obesity, Coronary heart disease, Diabetes, Hypertension, Adults, Longitudinal study,Cohort study

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/151958

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/151958

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