Munda languages are father tongues, but Japanese and Korean are not

Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; van Driem, George (2020). Munda languages are father tongues, but Japanese and Korean are not. Evolutionary human sciences, 2 Cambridge University Press 10.1017/ehs.2020.14

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Over two decades ago, it was observed that the linguistic affinity of the language spoken by a particular population tended to correlate with the predominant paternal, i.e. Y-chromosomal, lineage found in that population. Such correlations were found to be ubiquitous but not universal, and the striking exceptions to such conspicuous patterns of correlation between linguistic and genetic phylogeography elicit particular interest and beg for clarification. Within the Austroasiatic language family, the Munda languages are a clear-cut case of father tongues, whereas Japanese and Korean are manifestly not. In this study, the cases of Munda and Japanese are juxtaposed. A holistic understanding of these contrasting cases of ethnolinguistic prehistory with respect to the father tongue correlation will first necessitate a brief exposition of the phylogeography of the Y chromosomal lineage O. Then triangulation discloses some contours and particulars of both long lost episodes of ethnolinguistic prehistory.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies > Institute of Linguistics

UniBE Contributor:

van Driem, George

Subjects:

400 Language > 410 Linguistics

ISSN:

2513-843X

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sonja Latscha

Date Deposited:

23 Feb 2021 14:12

Last Modified:

16 Mar 2021 06:28

Publisher DOI:

10.1017/ehs.2020.14

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/152199

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/152199

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