Cricothyroidotomy competence and injuries using nonmedical equipment: A crossover noninferiority randomised controlled trial in a porcine cadaver model.

Nabecker, Sabine; Hornshaw, Tobias Alexander; Greif, Robert; Conrad, Carl; Rohrer, Mara; Theiler, Lorenz; Riva, Thomas (2021). Cricothyroidotomy competence and injuries using nonmedical equipment: A crossover noninferiority randomised controlled trial in a porcine cadaver model. European journal of anaesthesiology, 38(3), pp. 302-308. European Society of Anaesthesiology 10.1097/EJA.0000000000001444

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BACKGROUND

International guidelines recommend cricothyroidotomy as a life-saving procedure for 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' situations. Although commercially available sets facilitate surgical cricothyroidotomy, regular training seems to be the key to success.

OBJECTIVES

The goal was to investigate if trained anaesthetists are able to transfer their skill in one surgical cricothyroidotomy technique to another. The primary hypothesis postulated that trained anaesthetists could perform an emergency cricothyroidotomy equally fast and successfully with a pocketknife compared with a surgical cricothyroidotomy set.

DESIGN

Crossover noninferiority randomised controlled trial.

SETTING

After written informed consent and ethics committee approval, this single-centre study was performed at the University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

PARTICIPANTS

Altogether, 61 study participants already familiar with surgical cricothyroidotomy were included.

INTERVENTION

The use of a commercially available cricothyroidotomy set was compared with a short-bladed pocketknife and ballpoint pen barrel. A pig-larynx cadaver model including trachea, with pig skin overlaid, was used. Participants underwent additional training sessions in both procedures.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The primary outcome was the time necessary to position the tracheal tube or pen barrel in the trachea. Other outcome parameters were success rate, tracheal and laryngeal injuries and preferred device.

RESULTS

Cricothyroidotomy with the pocketknife was performed significantly faster and equally successfully as compared with the cricothyroidotomy sets. Tracheal and laryngeal injuries were similar in both groups. Paratracheal or submucosal placement of the pen barrel occurred in 32%, compared with 29% for the tracheal tube. Sixty-six per cent of participants preferred the cricothyroidotomy set.

CONCLUSION

Regularly trained anaesthetists are able to accomplish cricothyroidotomy irrespective of the equipment used. A pocketknife with a ballpoint pen barrel was just as effective as a commercially available surgical set.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy

UniBE Contributor:

Nabecker, Sabine; Greif, Robert; Theiler, Lorenz and Riva, Thomas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0265-0215

Publisher:

European Society of Anaesthesiology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannie Wurz

Date Deposited:

29 Apr 2021 15:34

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2021 15:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/EJA.0000000000001444

PubMed ID:

33470688

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.152930

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/152930

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