Insomnia Symptoms and Acute Coronary Syndrome-Induced Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms: A Comprehensive Analysis of Cross-sectional and Prospective Associations

von Känel, Roland; Meister-Langraf, Rebecca E.; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Barth, Jürgen; Schnyder, Ulrich; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Znoj, Hansjörg; Princip, Mary (2021). Insomnia Symptoms and Acute Coronary Syndrome-Induced Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms: A Comprehensive Analysis of Cross-sectional and Prospective Associations. Annals of behavioral medicine, 55(10), pp. 1019-1030. Oxford University Press 10.1093/abm/kaaa128

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Background: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) induces clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in 12% of patients. Subjective sleep problems are a risk factor for the development of PTSS, but this is underexplored in patients with ACS.

Purpose: To examine the association of insomnia symptoms with ACS-induced PTSS.

Methods: In this longitudinal study with 154 patients (all white, 84.4% male, mean age 58.7 years) with a verified ACS, insomnia symptoms were interviewer assessed at hospital admission and at 3 months, using the Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS)-4. ACS-induced PTSS were assessed with the Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale 3 months after hospital admission. In multivariable linear models, insomnia symptoms were regressed on PTSS, adjusting for demographics, clinical variables, health behaviors, and psychological data, including cognitive depressive symptoms.

Results: Greater insomnia symptoms at admission (β = .165, p = .034), greater increase in insomnia symptoms from admission to 3 months (β = .233, p = .008), and greater insomnia symptoms at 3 months (β = .239, p = .002) were independently associated with more severe total PTSS at 3 months. Concerning the individual PTSS clusters, both insomnia symptoms at admission (β = .214, p = .007) and at 3 months (β = .213, p = .012) were independently associated with reeexperiencing symptoms. Removing sleep items from PTSS scores and excluding patients on antidepressants in two sensitivity analyses did not substantially change the results.

Conclusions: Insomnia symptoms could play an important role in the development and severity of ACS-induced PTSS. This relationship seems not simply explained by the fact that sleeping difficulties are inherent to the phenotype of posttraumatic stress disorder.

Clinical Trial information: NCT01781247.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Psychological and Behavioral Health

UniBE Contributor:

Znoj, Hans Jörg

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1532-4796

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sina Röthlisberger

Date Deposited:

09 Apr 2021 16:06

Last Modified:

06 Oct 2021 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/abm/kaaa128

PubMed ID:

33580657

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.153277

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/153277

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