Ecological markers to monitor migratory bird populations: Integrating citizen science and transboundary management for conservation purposes

Nadal, Jesús; Ponz, Carolina; Margalida, Antoni; Pennisi, Lisa (2020). Ecological markers to monitor migratory bird populations: Integrating citizen science and transboundary management for conservation purposes. Journal of environmental management, 255, p. 109875. Elsevier 10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.109875

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Countries share responsibility for the management and conservation of migratory bird species. However, a limited understanding of population dynamics hampers the implementation of harvest and transboundary management. Age-ratios and population density can be useful indicators to assess population dynamics to
improve management and conservation actions. Here, the dynamics of an Atlantic population of Common quail Coturnix coturnix, using 32,508 quail samples and 4814 hunter questionnaires over a 20-year period (1996–2016) served as a comparative study for examining age-ratio patterns related to different geographic zones, population density and weather parameters. Results show that age-ratios varied over zones and years, specifically age-ratio 1 (AR1), used as an index of late breeding attempts, varied from 0.1 to 0.21. Age-ratio 2 (AR2), a surrogate of
central recruitment, varied from 0.16 to 0.66. Finally, age-ratio 3 (AR3), used as an indicator of the population’s annual breeding success, varied from 3.69 to 6.68. Age-ratio is linked to internal and external factors (i.e. effect of rainfall, variations over time and density-dependent relationships) depicting how quail age groups make segregated migration in time and space. Quail age groups perform a complex pattern of migration because of entwined changes in abundance, migration routes and timing, influencing population connectivity and dynamics.
Our findings highlight the relevance of citizen science and transboundary agreements to improve management and conservation measures of migrant species. Administrations and policy-makers in developed and developing
countries must coordinate efforts to engage hunters in a participatory management systems to achieve sustainability.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Conservation Biology

UniBE Contributor:

Margalida, Antoni

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)

ISSN:

0301-4797

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Olivier Roth

Date Deposited:

14 Apr 2021 09:58

Last Modified:

18 Apr 2021 03:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.109875

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/154276

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/154276

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