Emphasizing Urgency of Climate Change Is Insufficient to Increase Policy Support

Fesenfeld, Lukas Paul; Rinscheid, Adrian (2021). Emphasizing Urgency of Climate Change Is Insufficient to Increase Policy Support. One earth, 4(3), pp. 411-424. Elsevier 10.1016/j.oneear.2021.02.010

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Although many people are concerned about climate change, active public support for ambitious policies is still lagging behind. How can this gap be closed? Recent work has theorized that the perceived urgency of climate change drives public support for climate policy, but this lacks empirical evidence. Using advanced sparse regressions and comparative survey-embedded framing experiments with 9,911 eligible voters in Germany and the United States, we empirically studied the role of perceived urgency. Our study provides two findings. First, although perceived urgency is key in driving support for “low-cost” mitigation policies, it does not lead to more support for “high-cost” mitigation policies where the behavioral implications are visible. Second, while temporal reframing does not increase policy support or feelings of dread, context information about demand-side mitigation increases support for such costly climate policies. The results are particularly relevant for democracies, where ambitious policies require the support of citizens.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

03 Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences > Social Sciences > Institute of Political Science

UniBE Contributor:

Fesenfeld, Lukas Paul

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 320 Political science

ISSN:

2590-3322

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jack Kessel Baker

Date Deposited:

19 Apr 2021 16:04

Last Modified:

19 Apr 2021 16:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.oneear.2021.02.010

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/154407

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/154407

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