The impact of Holocene climate setbacks on Neolithic societies in Eastern Europe: ways of scientific cooperation and exchange

Andriiovych, Marta; Shydlosvskyi, Pavlo; Hafner, Albert (2020). The impact of Holocene climate setbacks on Neolithic societies in Eastern Europe: ways of scientific cooperation and exchange. Vita Antiqua, 12, pp. 7-14. Center of paleoethnological researches, Taras Shevchenko Nationional University of Kyiv 10.37098/VA-2020-12-7-14

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The past year 2020 became a turning point for large parts of society and the humanities and social sciences are no exception. The challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic remind the scientific community that human-environment relations are of great social relevance. Societal crises, currently triggered by the emergence of unknown viruses or in the future by climate change, are essentially the result of widening human activities since the last 12,000 years. The Holocene, the most recent epoch in the history of the Earth, is characterized by the intrusion of humans into natural ecological systems. The invention of agriculture and animal husbandry introduced new forms of land use and transformed entire biomes. With the transition to reproductive forms of economy, anthropogenic pressure on the environment is becoming stronger. The clearing of forests for cultivation, firewood and building materials, the grazing of livestock and the artificial spread of new plant and animal species have led to profound changes and extensive openings of the landscape. The transformation from mobile hunter-gatherer societies to sedentary farmers in the Neolithic leads via the innovations of the metal ages directly to the globalized societies of the 21st century and their increasingly frenetic economy of growing consumption. Humans are more and more becoming victims of the successes of the Neolithic Revolution and overcoming environmental crises will require great efforts in the future.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of Archaeological Sciences > Pre- and Early History
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of Archaeological Sciences

Graduate School:

Graduate School of the Humanities (GSH)

UniBE Contributor:

Andriiovych, Marta and Hafner, Albert

Subjects:

900 History > 930 History of ancient world (to ca. 499)

ISSN:

2519-4542

Publisher:

Center of paleoethnological researches, Taras Shevchenko Nationional University of Kyiv

Language:

English

Submitter:

Albert Hafner-Lafitte

Date Deposited:

09 Jun 2021 08:06

Last Modified:

10 Jun 2021 08:34

Publisher DOI:

10.37098/VA-2020-12-7-14

Additional Information:

Special edition: Climate Impact on East European Neolithic Societies.

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/156195

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/156195

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