Association between confirmed congenital Zika infection at birth and outcomes up to 3 years of life.

Hcini, Najeh; Kugbe, Yaovi; Rafalimanana, Zo Hasina Linah; Lambert, Véronique; Mathieu, Meredith; Carles, Gabriel; Baud, David; Panchaud, Alice; Pomar, Léo (2021). Association between confirmed congenital Zika infection at birth and outcomes up to 3 years of life. Nature communications, 12(1), p. 3270. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41467-021-23468-3

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Little is known about the long-term neurological development of children diagnosed with congenital Zika infection at birth. Here, we report the imaging and clinical outcomes up to three years of life of a cohort of 129 children exposed to Zika virus in utero. Eighteen of them (14%) had a laboratory confirmed congenital Zika infection at birth. Infected neonates have a higher risk of adverse neonatal and early infantile outcomes (death, structural brain anomalies or neurologic symptoms) than those who tested negative: 8/18 (44%) vs 4/111 (4%), aRR 10.1 [3.5-29.0]. Neurological impairment, neurosensory alterations or delays in motor acquisition are more common in infants with a congenital Zika infection at birth: 6/15 (40%) vs 5/96 (5%), aRR 6.7 [2.2-20.0]. Finally, infected children also have an increased risk of subspecialty referral for suspected neurodevelopmental delay by three years of life: 7/11 (64%) vs 7/51 (14%), aRR 4.4 [1.9-10.1]. Infected infants without structural brain anomalies also appear to have an increased risk, although to a lesser extent, of neurological abnormalities. It seems paramount to offer systematic testing for congenital ZIKV infection in cases of in utero exposure and adapt counseling based on these results.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Panchaud Monnat, Alice Elke Martine

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2041-1723

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

09 Jun 2021 11:38

Last Modified:

14 Jun 2021 08:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41467-021-23468-3

PubMed ID:

34075035

Additional Information:

Panchaud and Pomar contributed equally to this work.

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/156756

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/156756

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