Gait patterns and mood in everyday life: A comparison between depressed patients and non-depressed controls

Adolph, Dirk; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Niemeyer, Helen; Michalak, Johannes (2021). Gait patterns and mood in everyday life: A comparison between depressed patients and non-depressed controls. Cognitive therapy and research, 45(6), pp. 1128-1140. Springer 10.1007/s10608-021-10215-7

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Background Previous laboratory findings suggest deviant gait characteristics in depressed individuals (i.e., reduced walk- ing speed and vertical up-and-down movements, larger lateral swaying movements, slumped posture). However, since most studies to date assessed gait in the laboratory, it is largely an open question whether this association also holds in more naturalistic, everyday life settings. Thus, within the current study we (1) aimed at replicating these results in an everyday life and (2) investigated whether gait characteristics could predict change in current mood.
Methods Werecruitedasampleofpatients(n=35)sufferingfrommajordepressivedisorderandasampleofageandgender matched non-depressed controls (n = 36). During a 2-day assessment we continuously recorded gait patterns, general move- ment intensity and repetitively assessed the participant’s current mood.
Results We replicated previous laboratory results and found that patients as compared to non-depressed controls showed reduced walking speed and reduced vertical up-and-down movements, as well as a slumped posture during everyday life episodes of walking. Moreover, independent of clinical diagnoses, higher walking speed, and more vertical up-and-down movements significantly predicted more subsequent positive mood, while changes in mood did not predict subsequent changes in gait patterns.
Conclusion In sum, our results support expectations that embodiment (i.e., the relationship between bodily expression of emotion and emotion processing itself) in depression is also observable in naturalistic settings, and that depression is bodily manifested in the way people walk. The data further suggest that motor displays affect mood in everyday life.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Tschacher, Wolfgang

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0147-5916

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Wolfgang Tschacher

Date Deposited:

19 Jul 2021 12:31

Last Modified:

31 Oct 2021 01:40

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10608-021-10215-7

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/157593

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/157593

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