Surgical Site Infections Are Associated With Higher Blood Loss and Open Access in General Thoracic Practice.

Aeschbacher, Pauline; Nguyen, Thanh-Long; Dorn, Patrick; Kocher, Gregor Jan; Lutz, Jon Andri (2021). Surgical Site Infections Are Associated With Higher Blood Loss and Open Access in General Thoracic Practice. Frontiers in Surgery, 8(656249), p. 656249. Frontiers 10.3389/fsurg.2021.656249

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Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most costly and second most frequent healthcare-associated infections in the Western world. They are responsible for higher postoperative mortality and morbidity rates and longer hospital stays. The aim of this study is to analyze which factors are associated with SSI in a modern general thoracic practice. Methods: Data were collected from our department's quality database. Consecutive patients operated between January 2014 and December 2018 were included in this retrospective study. Results: A total of 2430 procedures were included. SSIs were reported in 37 cases (1.5%). The majority of operations were video-assisted (64.6%). We observed a shift toward video-assisted thoracic surgery in the subgroup of anatomical resections during the study period (2014: 26.7%, 2018: 69.3%). The multivariate regression analysis showed that blood loss >100 ml (p = 0.029, HR 2.70) and open surgery (p = 0.032, HR 2.37) are independent risk factors for SSI. The latter was higher in open surgery than in video-assisted thoracic procedures (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of anatomical resection, we found the same correlation (p = 0.043). SSIs are also associated with significantly longer mean hospital stays (17.7 vs. 7.8 days, p < 0.001). Conclusion: As SSIs represent higher postoperative morbidity and costs, efforts should be made to maintain their rate as low as possible. In terms of prevention of SSIs, video-assisted thoracic surgery should be favored over open surgery whenever possible.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Thoracic Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Aeschbacher, Pauline; Nguyen, Thanh-Long; Dorn, Patrick; Kocher, Gregor and Lutz, Jon Andri

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2296-875X

Publisher:

Frontiers

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thomas Michael Marti

Date Deposited:

28 Jul 2021 09:17

Last Modified:

01 Aug 2021 02:59

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fsurg.2021.656249

PubMed ID:

34250005

Uncontrolled Keywords:

complication minimal invasive surgery surgical site infection thoracic surgery video-assisted thoracic surgery

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/157718

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/157718

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