Cognitive biases in blood-injection-injury phobia: A review

Abado, Elinor; Aue, Tatjana; Okon-Singer, Hadas (2021). Cognitive biases in blood-injection-injury phobia: A review. Frontiers in psychiatry, 12(678891), pp. 1-14. Frontiers 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.678891

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Blood-injection-injury (BII) phobia can lead to avoidance of crucial medical procedures and to detrimental health consequences, even among health workers. Yet unlike other specific phobias, BII phobia has been understudied. Specifically, while cognitive biases have been extensively investigated in other anxiety disorders, little is known about the same biases in BII phobia. The current article reviews cognitive biases in BII phobia and suggest future directions for further study and treatment. The reviewed biases include attention, expectancy, memory, perception, and interpretation biases. The investigation of these biases is highly relevant, as cognitive biases have been found to interact with anxiety symptoms. Results showed that attention, expectancy, and memory biases are involved in BII phobia, while no studies were found on interpretation nor perception biases. Mixed results were found for attention bias, as different studies found different components of attention bias, while others found no attention bias at all. Similarly, some studies found a-priori/a-posteriori expectancy biases, while other studies found only one type of bias. A better understanding of the cognitive particularities of BII phobia may lead to better treatments and ultimately reduce avoidance of needles and blood-related situations, thereby enabling individuals with BII phobia to undergo potentially life-saving medical procedures.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > PSY-Weitere Forschungsgruppen

UniBE Contributor:

Aue, Tatjana

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

1664-0640

Publisher:

Frontiers

Language:

English

Submitter:

Tatjana Aue

Date Deposited:

06 Aug 2021 16:00

Last Modified:

06 Aug 2021 16:00

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fpsyt.2021.678891

PubMed ID:

34326784

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/157884

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/157884

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