Limbic links to paranoia: increased resting-state functional connectivity between amygdala, hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex in schizophrenia patients with paranoia.

Walther, Sebastian; Lefebvre, Stephanie; Conring, Frauke; Gangl, Nicole; Nadesalingam, Niluja; Alexaki, Danai; Wüthrich, Florian; Rüter, Maximilian; Viher, Petra V; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Stegmayer, Katharina (2021). Limbic links to paranoia: increased resting-state functional connectivity between amygdala, hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex in schizophrenia patients with paranoia. (In Press). European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience Springer 10.1007/s00406-021-01337-w

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Paranoia is a frequent and highly distressing experience in psychosis. Models of paranoia suggest limbic circuit pathology. Here, we tested whether resting-state functional connectivity (rs-fc) in the limbic circuit was altered in schizophrenia patients with current paranoia. We collected MRI scans in 165 subjects including 89 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, brief psychotic disorder, schizophreniform disorder) and 76 healthy controls. Paranoia was assessed using a Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale composite score. We tested rs-fc between bilateral nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex between groups and as a function of paranoia severity. Patients with paranoia had increased connectivity between hippocampus and amygdala compared to patients without paranoia. Likewise, paranoia severity was linked to increased connectivity between hippocampus and amygdala. Furthermore, paranoia was associated with increased connectivity between orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex. In addition, patients with paranoia had increased functional connectivity within the frontal hubs of the default mode network compared to healthy controls. These results demonstrate that current paranoia is linked to aberrant connectivity within the core limbic circuit and prefrontal cortex reflecting amplified threat processing and impaired emotion regulation. Future studies will need to explore the association between limbic hyperactivity, paranoid ideation and perceived stress.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Health Sciences (GHS)

UniBE Contributor:

Walther, Sebastian; Conring, Frauke; Gangl, Nicole; Nadesalingam, Niluja; Alexaki, Despoina Danai; Wüthrich, Florian; Rüter, Maximilian; Viher, Petra; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland and Stegmayer, Katharina Deborah Lena

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0940-1334

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sebastian Walther

Date Deposited:

08 Nov 2021 14:46

Last Modified:

21 Feb 2022 15:17

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00406-021-01337-w

PubMed ID:

34636951

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Amygdala Functional connectivity Limbic system Paranoia Resting-state fMRI Schizophrenia

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/160031

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/160031

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