The anatomical and cellular basis of immune surveillance in the central nervous system

Ransohoff, Richard M; Engelhardt, Britta (2012). The anatomical and cellular basis of immune surveillance in the central nervous system. Nature reviews - immunology, 12(9), pp. 623-35. London: Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/nri3265

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

The central nervous system (CNS) comprises the brain, spinal cord, optic nerves and retina, and contains post-mitotic, delicate cells. As the rigid coverings of the CNS render swelling dangerous and destructive, inflammatory reactions must be carefully controlled in CNS tissues. Nevertheless, effector immune responses that protect the host during CNS infection still occur in the CNS. Here, we describe the anatomical and cellular basis of immune surveillance in the CNS, and explain how this shapes the unique immunology of these tissues. The Review focuses principally on insights gained from the study of autoimmune responses in the CNS and to a lesser extent on models of infectious disease. Furthermore, we propose a new model to explain how antigen-specific T cell responses occur in the CNS.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Theodor Kocher Institute

UniBE Contributor:

Engelhardt, Britta

ISSN:

1474-1733

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation
[7] Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Society

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:39

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:38

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/nri3265

PubMed ID:

22903150

Web of Science ID:

000308248200010

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/16035 (FactScience: 223585)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback