Plant Functional Types Differ in Their Long-term Nutrient Response to eCO2 in an Extensive Grassland

Seibert, Ruben; Andresen, Louise C.; Jarosch, Klaus A.; Moser, Gerald; Kammann, Claudia I.; Yuan, Naiming; Luterbacher, Jürg; Laughlin, Ronnie J.; Watson, Catherine J.; Erbs, Martin; Müller, Christoph (2021). Plant Functional Types Differ in Their Long-term Nutrient Response to eCO2 in an Extensive Grassland. Ecosystems Springer 10.1007/s10021-021-00703-y

[img]
Preview
Text
Seibert2021_Article_PlantFunctionalTypesDifferInTh.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (880kB) | Preview

Increasing atmospheric CO2 enhances plant biomass production and may thereby change nutrient concentrations in plant tissues. The objective of this study was to identify the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on nutrient concentrations of grassland biomass that have been grown for 16 years (1998–2013). The grassland biomass grown at the extensively managed Giessen FACE experiment, fumigated with ambient and elevated CO2 (aCO2; eCO2; +20%) was harvested twice annually. Concentrations of C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were determined separately for grasses, forbs and legumes. Under eCO2, the concentration of N was reduced in grasses, Ca was reduced in grasses and forbs, P was reduced in grasses but increased in legumes, Mg concentration was reduced in grasses, forbs and legumes and K was reduced in grasses but increased in forbs. The nutrient yield (in g nutrient yield of an element per m-2) of most elements indicated negative yield responses at a zero biomass response to eCO2 for grasses. K and Zn nutrient yields responded positively to eCO2 in forbs and Mn and Fe responded positively in forbs and legumes. The results suggest that under eCO2 the nutrient concentrations were not diluted by the CO2 fertilization effect. Rather, altered plant nutrient acquisitions via changed physiological mechanisms prevail for increased C assimilation under eCO2. Furthermore, other factors such as water or nutrient availability affected plant nutrient concentrations under eCO2.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography > Unit Soil Science
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography

UniBE Contributor:

Jarosch, Klaus

Subjects:

500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)
900 History > 910 Geography & travel

ISSN:

1432-9840

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Ariane Viviane Lisa Grimmer

Date Deposited:

18 Nov 2021 15:58

Last Modified:

18 Nov 2021 15:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10021-021-00703-y

Uncontrolled Keywords:

FACE; macronutrients; micronutrients; elevated CO2; climate change; GiFACE

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/160880

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/160880

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback