Homeland security: IgA immunity at the frontiers of the body

Macpherson, Andrew J; Geuking, Markus B; McCoy, Kathy D (2012). Homeland security: IgA immunity at the frontiers of the body. Trends in immunology, 33(4), pp. 160-7. Oxford: Elsevier Current Trends 10.1016/j.it.2012.02.002

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin produced in mammals, and is mostly secreted across mucous membranes. At these frontiers, which are constantly assaulted by pathogenic and commensal microbes, IgA provides part of a layered system of immune protection. In this review, we describe how IgA induction occurs through both T-dependent and T-independent mechanisms, and how IgA is generated against the prodigious load of commensal microbes after mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) have sampled a tiny fraction of the microbial consortia in the intestinal lumen. To function in this hostile environment, IgA must be induced behind the 'firewall' of the mesenteric lymph nodes to generate responses that integrate microbial stimuli, rather than the classical prime-boost effects characteristic of systemic immunity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Macpherson, Andrew; Geuking, Markus and McCoy, Kathleen

ISSN:

1471-4906

Publisher:

Elsevier Current Trends

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:40

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:38

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.it.2012.02.002

PubMed ID:

22410243

Web of Science ID:

000302839300002

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/16155 (FactScience: 223742)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback