Innate and adaptive immunity in host-microbiota mutualism

Macpherson, Andrew J; Geuking, Markus B; McCoy, Kathy D (2012). Innate and adaptive immunity in host-microbiota mutualism. Frontiers in bioscience (Scholar edition), 4, pp. 685-698. Frontiers in bioscience

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Healthy individuals live in peaceful co-existence with an immense load of intestinal bacteria. This symbiosis is advantageous for both the host and the bacteria. For the host it provides access to otherwise undigestible nutrients and colonization resistance against pathogens. In return the bacteria receive an excellent nutrient habitat. The mucosal immune adaptations to the presence of this commensal intestinal microflora are manifold. Although bacterial colonization has clear systemic consequences, such as maturation of the immune system, it is striking that the mutualistic adaptive (T and B cells) and innate immune responses are precisely compartmentalized to the mucosal immune system. Here we summarize the mechanisms of mucosal immune compartmentalization and its importance for a healthy host-microbiota mutualism.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Macpherson, Andrew; Geuking, Markus and McCoy, Kathleen

ISSN:

1945-0516

Publisher:

Frontiers in bioscience

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:40

Last Modified:

08 Jun 2016 10:34

PubMed ID:

22202085

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/16157 (FactScience: 223744)

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