The effect of red wine in modifying the salivary pellicle and modulating dental erosion kinetics.

S. Carvalho, Thiago; Pham, Khoa N.; Niemeyer, Samira H.; Baumann, Tommy (2021). The effect of red wine in modifying the salivary pellicle and modulating dental erosion kinetics. European journal of oral sciences, 129(1), e12749. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/eos.12749

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This study investigated the potential of red wine in modulating dental erosion kinetics in the presence or absence of salivary pellicle. Polished human enamel specimens were used in two conditions; presence or absence of acquired enamel pellicle; and subdivided according to exposure: red wine, orange juice, apple juice, or citric acid. The specimens were incubated in clarified whole human saliva (presence of acquired enamel pellicle) or in a humid chamber (absence of acquired enamel pellicle) for 2 h at 37°C, then in the test substances for 1 min, at 25°C, under shaking. This was repeated four times. Surface hardness was measured initially and after each cycle and surface reflection intensity was measured initially and after all cycles. In the presence of acquired enamel pellicle, red wine caused the least surface hardness loss, followed by orange juice, apple juice, and citric acid. Statistically significantly less surface reflection intensity loss was observed for red wine and orange juice than for apple juice and citric acid. In the absence of acquired enamel pellicle, red wine and orange juice caused less surface hardness loss than apple juice and citric acid. Orange juice showed the least surface reflection intensity loss, followed by red wine, citric acid, and apple juice. The polyphenol composition of these drinks can notably modulate the erosion kinetics.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Restorative Dentistry, Research

UniBE Contributor:

Saads Carvalho, Thiago; Pham, Nguyen Khoa; Niemeyer, Samira Helena and Baumann, Tommy

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

0909-8836

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Tommy Baumann

Date Deposited:

03 Jan 2022 13:12

Last Modified:

07 Jan 2022 07:56

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/eos.12749

PubMed ID:

33381873

Uncontrolled Keywords:

demineralization dental erosion enamel polyphenols salivary pellicle

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/162164

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/162164

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