Impact of Age at Pediatric Stroke on Long-term Cognitive Outcome.

Abgottspon, Stephanie; Thaqi, Qendresa; Steiner, Leonie; Slavova, Nedelina; Grunt, Sebastian; Steinlin, Maja; Everts, Regula (2022). Impact of Age at Pediatric Stroke on Long-term Cognitive Outcome. Neurology, 98(7), e721-e729. American Academy of Neurology 10.1212/WNL.0000000000013207

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OBJECTIVES

To investigate the impact of age at pediatric arterial ischemic stroke on long-term cognitive outcome in order to identify patients particularly at risk for the development of cognitive long-term cognitive sequelae.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study included patients in the chronic phase of stroke (> 2 years after stroke) previously diagnosed with neonatal or childhood arterial ischemic stroke and a control group. Participants with active epilepsy, severe learning difficulties, or behavioral problems hindering the cognitive assessment were excluded. Several cognitive domains, including intelligence, executive functions (working memory, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility), processing speed, memory, letter fluency, and visual-motor skills were assessed with neuropsychological tests. Cognitive long-term outcome was compared across patients after neonatal stroke (stroke between 0 and 28 days of life), early childhood stroke (stroke between 29 days and < 6 years) and late childhood stroke (stroke between ≥ 6 and < 16 years).

RESULTS

52 patients after neonatal or childhood arterial ischemic stroke (median age: 15.3 years, IQR = 10.6 - 18.7) and 49 healthy controls (median age: 13.6 years, IQR = 9.8 - 17.2) met the inclusion criteria. Cognitive outcome was significantly worse in the pediatric stroke group compared to the control group. A non-linear effect of age at stroke (irrespective of lesion size and lesion location) was found for cognitive flexibility, processing speed, and verbal learning with early childhood stroke (29 days to < 6 years) showing significantly worse cognitive outcome compared to neonatal or late childhood stroke (p < .05, FDR-corrected).

CONCLUSION

Age at stroke is an important factor for post-stroke recovery and modulates long-term cognitive outcome irrespective of lesion size and lesion location. Children after early childhood stroke are at particular risk for alterations of long-term cognitive functions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Neuropaediatrics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Health Sciences (GHS)

UniBE Contributor:

Abgottspon, Stephanie; Steiner, Leonie Serena; Slavova, Nedelina Bozhidarova; Grunt, Sebastian; Steinlin, Maja and Everts, Regula

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

1526-632X

Publisher:

American Academy of Neurology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Anette van Dorland

Date Deposited:

27 Dec 2021 13:17

Last Modified:

03 Mar 2022 17:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1212/WNL.0000000000013207

PubMed ID:

34916279

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/162871

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/162871

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