[Examination results and autopsy findings in assaults on elderly people]

Bode-Jänisch, Stefanie; Havermann, Robert; Germerott, Tanja; Fieguth, Armin (2010). [Examination results and autopsy findings in assaults on elderly people]. Archiv für Kriminologie, 226(5-6), pp. 176-86. Lübeck: Schmidt-Römhild

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As the percentage of elderly people in the population grows, violence against persons of advanced age constitutes an increasing social problem. The findings of the clinical forensic examinations (CE group) and autopsies performed on elderly violence victims (> or = 60 years) between 1999 and 2008 at the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Hanover Medical School were retrospectively analysed. In all, the study material comprised 55 victims of the CE group (35 females and 20 males, median age 73.5 years) and 55 autopsies (33 females and 22 males, median age 72.7 years). In most of the autopsy cases, the suspect was a family member or partner. In contrast, the alleged perpetrator was a stranger in most cases of the CE group. Blunt force injuries were most often found in the CE group victims (63.6%). Altogether, 38.2% (CE group) and 20.0% (autopsy cases) of the violent assaults were associated with robbery. In the majority of the CE cases, the victims suffered potentially or acute life-threatening injuries. In summary, the analysis shows that elderly people frequently become victims of robbery and blunt force injury. In most homicides of old people, the perpetrator is familiar to the victim. In surviving elderly violence victims, the assault is more likely to be reported to the police if the suspect is a stranger.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Germerott, Tanja

ISSN:

0003-9225

Publisher:

Schmidt-Römhild

Language:

German

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:10

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:05

PubMed ID:

21254704

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1658 (FactScience: 203513)

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