[Examination reports on survived strangulation cases]

Jänisch, Stefanie; Heine, Josephin; Günther, Detlef; Germerott, Tanja (2010). [Examination reports on survived strangulation cases]. Archiv für Kriminologie, 226(3-4), pp. 73-82. Lübeck: Schmidt-Römhild

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Clinical-forensic examination of strangulation victims is an increasing part of the routine of many forensic pathology institutes. The cases examined between 2004 and 2008 at the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Hanover Medical School were retrospectively analysed. In total, the study material comprised 218 victims (175 females and 43 males). In 80.7 %, the clinical-forensic examination was performed within 24 hours after the incident. In the overwhelming number of cases, the alleged perpetrator was no stranger. 128 victims (58.7 %) had strangulation marks, 32 victims (14.7 %) ligature marks and 65 victims (29.8 %) nail marks. Four victims showed injuries of the laryngeal and pharyngeal structures (reddening, hematomas, swelling and in one case a fracture of the cricoid cartilage on both sides). Extensive petechiae were predominantly seen in the conjunctivae, the buccal mucosa and the skin of the face in cases where the victims suffered a loss of consciousness. 87 cases (39.9% were classified as potentially life-threatening and 30 cases (13.8 %) as acute life-threatening events. This classification is of legal relevance for the penalty. In addition, 60 victims experienced sexual violence. These results suggest that early clinical-forensic examination is crucial for documenting forensic evidence in support of police investigations and may deliver significant details relevant in court.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Germerott, Tanja

ISSN:

0003-9225

Publisher:

Schmidt-Römhild

Language:

German

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:10

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:21

PubMed ID:

21121118

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1659 (FactScience: 203514)

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