Automatized online prediction of slow-wave peaks during non-rapid eye movement sleep in young and old individuals: Why we should not always rely on amplitude thresholds.

Wunderlin, Marina; König, Thomas; Zeller, Céline Jacqueline; Nissen, Christoph; Züst, Marc (2022). Automatized online prediction of slow-wave peaks during non-rapid eye movement sleep in young and old individuals: Why we should not always rely on amplitude thresholds. Journal of sleep research, 31(6), e13584. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jsr.13584

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Brain-state-dependent stimulation during slow-wave sleep is a promising tool for the treatment of psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. A widely used slow-wave prediction algorithm required for brain-state-dependent stimulation is based on a specific amplitude threshold in the electroencephalogram. However, due to decreased slow-wave amplitudes in aging and psychiatric conditions, this approach might miss many slow-waves because they do not fulfill the amplitude criterion. Here, we compared slow-wave peaks predicted via an amplitude-based versus a multidimensional approach using a topographical template of slow-wave peaks in 21 young and 21 older healthy adults. We validate predictions against the gold-standard of offline detected peaks. Multidimensionally predicted peaks resemble the gold-standard regarding spatiotemporal dynamics but exhibit lower peak amplitudes. Amplitude-based prediction, by contrast, is less sensitive, less precise and - especially in the older group - predicts peaks that differ from the gold-standard regarding spatiotemporal dynamics. Our results suggest that amplitude-based slow-wave peak prediction might not always be the ideal choice. This is particularly the case in populations with reduced slow-wave amplitudes, like older adults or psychiatric patients. We recommend the use of multidimensional prediction, especially in studies targeted at populations other than young and healthy individuals.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Geriatric Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Wunderlin, Marina; König, Thomas; Zeller, Céline Jacqueline; Nissen, Christoph and Züst, Marc

ISSN:

0962-1105

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pubmed Import

Date Deposited:

14 Mar 2022 08:59

Last Modified:

11 Nov 2022 00:11

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jsr.13584

PubMed ID:

35274389

Uncontrolled Keywords:

acoustic stimulation aging amplitude slow-wave prediction slow-wave sleep topographic maps

BORIS DOI:

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/167310

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